Creative Bee Studios

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River Heritage Mystery Quilt Reveal

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Image of Mississippi River Sunset

The sunset over the Mississippi River is your final clue that the mystery has ended.

Photo by Anastasia Gonzales.

The mystery is revealed! Take all of those wonderful blocks and set them in this really fun, fast design. I am happy to tell you that River Heritage goes together quickly and easily! Image of River Heritage

Click here for printer-friendly version: River Heritage Setting Instructions

Setting Instructions 

The biggest challenge is to make sure all the setting flying geese point away from the center block. This is easy to achieve by laying out all your sections on a flat surface or design wall.

Finished Size: 66 x 66 inches                                     WOF = width of fabric

RST = right sides together                                          I list the colors in my quilt for reference.

Cutting:

Fabric A (soft-white) setting:

Cut six 6 ½” x WOF to cut

*Sixteen 6 ½” squares

*Eight 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangles

 

Fabric B (watery aqua) setting:

For binding, cut eight 2 ¼” WOF strips

Cut four 6 ½ x WOF to cut

*Eight 6 ½” squares

*Eight 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangles

 

Fabric C (teal batik) setting squares:

Cut four 6 ½” squares

 

Fabric D (coral) outer setting:

Cut

*Four 6 ½ x 18 ½” rectangles

*Four 6 ½ x 24 ½” rectangles

*Four 1 x 12 ½” strips

 

Fabric E (aqua) outer border*:

Cut six 3 ½” x WOF to make:

*Two 3 ½ x 60 ½” strips

*Two 3 ½ x 66 ½” strips

Setting Assembly

  1. Large Flying Geese: Draw a diagonal line on wrong side of 16 Fabric A squares. Place a marked square on LEFT side of a Fabric B 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangle, RST. Stitch on the diagonal line. Press the corner triangle open. Trim excess fabric to ¼” seam. Repeat for the right corner of each rectangle. Make 8.
  2. Setting pieces: Draw a diagonal line on wrong side of 8 Fabric B squares. Place a square on the RIGHT side of a Fabric A 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangle RST. Stitch on the diagonal line. Press the corner triangle open and trim excess fabric to 1/4” seam. Make 4.

 

Place a marked Fabric B square on the LEFT side of Fabric A 6 ½” x 12 ½” rectangle RST. Stitch on the diagonal line. Press the corner triangle open and trim excess fabric to ¼” seam. Make 4.

Section Assembly

I suggest laying out all the pieces of your quilt on a design wall or a flat surface to make sure you keep all the points in the correct direction. Notice that the Paddle Wheel block is in the very center and that each flying geese unit points away from that center block. I will also refer to the blocks as Center, North, South, East, West, Northwest, Northeast, Southwest, and Southeast for those who want to use different placement of their individual blocks.

 

Add a flying geese to opposite sides of each of the blocks, Eagle’s Nest (North), Railroad Crossing (South), Port and Starboard (West), and Lighted Bridge (East) as shown below. Note the direction of each block and the flying geese units. Press seams towards the blocks.

 

 

Image of Eagle's Nest Block

Eagle’s Nest/North

Image of Rail Road Crossing Block

Railroad Crossing/South

Image of Port and Starboard/West

Port and Starboard/West

 

 

 

Image of Lighted Bridge Block

Lighted Bridge/East

When you lay these units in their places above, below, and to the left and right of Paddle Wheel (Center), they should form a cross shape. Do not stitch the units together yet.

Next you will make the four corner sections, using the Flock of Geese (Northwest), Hovering Hawks (Northeast), Tree Line (Southeast), and Trail of Tears (Southwest) blocks. Check that your setting units are positioned so that the colored corners are pointing inward, towards the Paddlewheel (Center) block and so that they form an “on-point” square “floating” beneath the blocks.

Sew one setting unit to the top (Flock of Geese/Northwest and Hovering Hawks/Northeast) or bottom (Trail of Tears/Southwest and Tree Line/Southeast) of the block. Press to the setting unit. Sew a setting square (Fabric C) to the light end of the other setting unit. Press to the setting unit. Match seams, RST, and sew the two units together. Add the short outer setting bar (coral) to the side and press to the bar. Finish the corner section by stitching the long outer setting bar to the top (or bottom) of the section.

Repeat for each corner unit. Refer to the diagrams below.

Image of Flock of Geese block

Flock of Geese/Northwest

Image of Hovering Hawks block

Hovering Hawks/Northeast         

 

 

Image of Trail of Tears block

Trail of Tears/Southwest

Image of Tree Line Block

Tree Line/Southeast

 

Lay out all sections. I suggest taking a black and white picture at this point to be certain all the flying geese units are pointing away from the center Paddle Wheel block and the setting units point inward.

 

 

Making Three Rows:

Top Row – Turn the Eagle’s Nest (North) section, RST, onto the corner section, Flock of Geese (Northwest), and stitch. Press to the corner section. Add the Hovering Hawks (Northeast) corner section. Press to the corner section.

Middle Row – Turn Paddle Wheel (Center), RST, onto the Port and Starboard (West) section and stitch. Press toward Paddle Wheel (Center). Likewise, add the Light Bridge (East) section and press toward Paddle Wheel (Center).

Bottom Row – Place Railroad Crossing (South), RST, on Trail of Tears (Southwest) corner section. Stitch and press towards Trail of Tears (Southwest) section. Likewise, stitch Tree Line (Southeast) to Railroad Crossing (South) and press to Tree Line (Southeast) section.

Stitch rows together, nestling seams, and press seams open.

Outer borders: While it’s important that I give you measurements for your borders, I do suggest that you measure your quilt length through the center (and after those borders are on, do likewise with the width) to determine an exact measurement. Then cut your borders to that length. Mark the center of your border with a pin and do likewise with the edge of your quilt. Pin the border to the edge, matching the center pins and pin the border in several places from the center to the corners of the top. This will help “square” your quilt and you (or your quilter) will be very happy later that you did this!

Sew Fabric E 3 ½” x 60 ½” strips to the left and right sides of the quilt top.

Sew Fabric E 3 ½” x 66 ½” strips to the top and bottom to complete the quilt top.

Image of Quilt

Finishing your River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt:

Layer your top, batting, and backing for quilting.

As a long-arm quilter, I suggest that backing and batting be 6 inches longer and wider than the quilt top. (I realize domestic machine quilters don’t need that much extra fabric and that each long-arm quilter may have a different requirement.) I used Warm and Natural Cotton Batting. I also like and often use Hobbs 80/20.

In quilting my River Heritage, I did custom quilting on each block to accentuate the piecing and uniqueness. I did a stylized free-hand quilting on the setting and border.Image of Back of Quilt

I used the Prairie Point Hanging Method and basted them on prior to adding my binding. I made these larger than normal to allow for the 6-inch requirement for our local quilt show. Notice the looseness in the points? That helps the extra-large pole to slide through easier and avoids pulling on the quilt. Before hand-stitching the points down, I folded the prairie point up over the stitched binding. Then I laid a skinny ruler along the top edge of the quilt binding and folded the prairie point back over the ruler. I stitched the point of the prairie point where it laid. This gave two binding widths of looseness in the prairie point. This isn’t necessary for normal hanging methods, but seemed to work well for this purpose.

Stitch on binding and turn by hand.

I hope you’ve enjoyed making River Heritage! I was pleasantly surprised to find a beautiful ribbon on my quilt this weekend at our local quilt show!Image of Quilt with Ribbon

Please share your quilt pictures on Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag: #riverheritage in your post!

Note: Most of the blocks in this quilt are classics, found in many books and other sources. Paddle Wheel, Tree Line, and Lighted Bridge are blocks I created to fit our theme and the setting. The setting is adapted from the book, Circle of Nine by Janet Houts & Jean Ann Wright. I love this book and recommend it (available on Amazon)!

This has been an adventure–coming up with a theme, choosing blocks (creating others), coming up with pictures for each month, and learning more about Electric Quilter 8, Canva, and WordPress! Thank you all for joining me on this journey. I hope you love your River Heritage!
                                                                                  Karla

You might not be a quilter if…

Buyer’s beware…Image of Harry Potter Quilts Not Blankets Meme

Recently I’ve had companies promoting to me on my Facebook feed. They show pictures of fabulously pieced and appliqued quilts for sale at AMAZING prices! These are intricate and well-done, obviously made by individuals–and not massed-produced, quilts. The problem is they are fake companies stealing real quilters’ pictures and using them to cheat other people.

What was my first clue?  THEY CALLED THEM BLANKETS!

It’s been a “thing” in my family for years that when one of them asks for me to pass them a blanket, I shout, “They’re quilts, not blankets! I am not a blanketer!” (Kinda like Harry Potter, only with a pretend wand.)

 

Second clue: $59

It’s amazing (and kinda sad) how many people respond excitedly to these posts by tagging their friends and loved ones  to, for example, buy the brilliant pieced, appliqued, and quilted musician-themed quilt of a cello for $59! (We all know that might cover the cost of the batting and backing.)

Third clue: TONS of different quilts.

It’s like they just keep snagging quilt pictures from Etsy,  Craftsy and Pinterest and slapping  prices on them to sell! I was going to share a pic of one company promoting a Star Wars quilt that appears to have been hanging in a quilt show. I don’t want to do more harm than good by posting the fake site , so I won’t.

I’ve recently joined a pattern-maker group and, sure enough, they are suggesting you search these sites to see if these companies have stolen your pictures. (I have no idea what you do if that happens.)

What to do about the sites? I try to report the company, when allowed by Facebook. I also comment on the post that the company is a fraud. The only other thing I know to do is to tell as many people as I know not to fall for something that looks too good to be true.

I hope these bad people get caught before they steal more people’s money and, who knows, identity!

No mercy in my house–’cause that’s what you get when you call a quilt a blanket!

Several followers have asked about out-of-stock patterns in my Etsy shop: They are restocked! I apologize that I was unable to respond to your notes – IT glitches, I guess!  Shop here:  www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios.com
Subscribe below for weekly posts.

 

 

 

Stitch One, Curl One.

Quilting MuscleImage of Machine Stitching on Binding

Back in the day (as a new quilter), I got real excited about setting up my sewing work space. I didn’t trust my instincts (and I had already mastered the art of buying quilting books), so I bought the latest title on the topic. I devoured that book, studying every picture and reading every word. I set up my sewing space just like the author suggested.  I really liked how productive I could be  in my little sewing station, everything within reach…until I started to hurt.

The more I sewed, the less I liked it. I’m not saying there was anything wrong with the suggestions for optimum quilting output. It just didn’t work for me.

Now, I tend to keep lots of tension in my shoulders and upper back.  Improper chair height, table height, poor posture (very me) are all contributing factors for tension in the upper back area. But I had noticed some changes in the lower half of my body, too. Maybe it was just the aging process–or was I just sitting on my backside too much? Image of Bitmoji

Step One: Move that iron across the room.

I may lose a few minutes of stitching time walking to and from my ironing board, but that’s okay because that little walk gives me a chance to reach up, stretch backwards and roll my shoulders. Sometimes that’s all it takes to keep me from stiffening up over a day of stitching. I no longer have everything within reach. It’s a different mind-set, really. Now I try to think of the extra movement as a chance to move instead of wasted time.

Step Two: Creative Movement.

Whether you are getting up to press seams, cut fabric, or grab lunch, try to throw in some steps you don’t normally do. How about a side-to-side step? Or step-touch (like walking down the aisle for a wedding). Sometimes when I am loading a quilt on my long-arm, I move from one end to the other by doing small plies or squats. Now I’m not talking about deep, hurt-your-knees- or-lose-your-balance kind of movements, but small movements that wake your body up and warm up some cold muscles.

If you like creative movement, take a look at this set of dvd’s: Body Groove. I’ve only had mine a week and I love them. I can’t say it’s a hard work out, but it’s sooooo enjoyable and freeing that I look forward to that time every day! These are simple movements to music (not aerobics) that you do at your own ability level.

Steps Eight to Ten Thousand: Turn on the tracker.

As much as I talk back to my Fitbit some days when it fusses at me to move, it really helps me to realize how sedentary my life can be.  Your phone may work to track your steps, also. The down side to tracking steps is when you forget to take your tracker off it’s charger and feel like you’ve wasted all of those steps you took (crazy)! I have been known to drive back home for my Fitbit prior to line dancing! Here is a link to Fitbit.

Stitch One, Curl One…or something like that.

I keep a small free weight (a full water bottle works, too) near me so that when I take a break I can do a few bicep curls, shoulder presses, or tricep curls just to keep the blood moving and my muscles awake.  I feel like my brain works better, too, when I am more aware of my whole body while I’m stitching.

How do you stitch pain-free? Do you have exercises to recommend? Special chairs or tools? Please share in the comments below.

Image of Running Bitmoji

Please keep in mind that I am a quilter, not a doctor or trainer. Please don’t hurt yourself. Seek medical advise before starting any exercise program.

Subscribe to follow my blog. Check out #usebothsides patterns HERE. Join the Free River Heritage Mystery BOM Quilt at the tap above.

 

 

Quilt Fusible-in a Pinch

I first fell in love with light-weight fusible when I applied Mistyfuse to fabric for use with shaped rulers.

That’s how I made this quilt.

Image of Quilt at Beach

Water Colours

I love that it is like a weightless “spiderweb” of glue. It is so soft, your machine won’t even know it is there. However, there is no paper on this fusible and that caused serious limitations for my use of it. I do a lot of fusible applique which require tracing a template.

My favorite paper-backed fusible is SoftFuse because it is lightweight like Mistyfuse. I recommend Softfuse for students making #usebothsides patterns (click here to see patterns)

So when I heard about this method of transferring a design to fabric with Mistyfuse, I wanted to check it out. Here’s what I learned…

First draw or trace your design with lead pencil onto parchment paper. You need to make it dark. I used a #2 lead pencil.

Then cut a piece of Mistyfuse large enough to cover your design. Using a protective sheet (I used a Goddess Sheet), press the Mistyfuse to the wrong side of your fabric. The Goddess Sheet give the Mistyfuse a sheen so you can see where it is on your fabric.Image of Bee TracingImage of Goddess Sheet Packaging

Mistyfuse on FabricLet it cool and then lay the fabric, fusible side up, on a hard surface. Lay your parchment paper, design side down, on your fabric and trace the design with a hard pointed object. I used a stylist tool. I peeked to make sure the design was showing before I moved the tracing.

Cut your design on the lines.

What I learned…

Don’t trace onto the right side of your fabric. I had to redo my bee after I made that mistake.

The lead markings transfer much easier onto the Mistyfuse than they do directly onto fabric.  The finer your pencil, the finer your lines. I over-did my lead tracing because I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to see it. I could actually use a finer point and get a more precise drawing than I anticipated.

When you need an alternative to paper-backed fusible, this is a great option!Image of Fabric Bee

Image of Deer Mount Quilt

Jack Quilt Pattern

Got a favorite cabin or lodge to decorate? Here is Jack (buck)! He’s made with both sides of Mossy Oak fabric on a scrappy background. Click HERE for the #usebothsides pattern.

 

River Heritage – Tree Line

Welcome to Month Nine, the final block reveal in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt!Image of Trees Along River

Tree Line

Tree Line uses six flying geese to make three trees. We start by making the trunks for each tree and then add the tree tops and sky to make three columns. Use your own color scheme – your trees don’t have to be green and sky doesn’t have to be blue! Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:
From light fabric:                                         From dark or medium fabric:                                
Twelve –  2 ½-inch squares (sky)                  One – 1 x 1 ½ inch (trunk)
Two – 1 ½ x 2 ¼-inch (ground)                      One – 1 x 2 ½ inch (trunk)
Two – 2 ½ x 2 ¼-inch (ground)                      One – 1 x 5 ½ inch (trunk)
Two – 5 ½ x 2 ¼-inch (ground)
One – 4 ½ inch square (sky)                           Six – 2 ½ x 4 ½ inch (flying geese)Image of Quilt Block
One – 4 ½ x 8 ½ inch (sky)
One – 4 ½ x 1 ½ inch (sky)
One – 1 ½ x 12 ½ inch (sky)                           RST = right sides together

 

Trunks:

Stitch one ground on either side of same length trunk fabric. Press to trunks. Make all three.

Flying Geese:

Draw a diagonal line on the reverse side of each light 2 ½ inch square. Place one square on the right corner of each 2 ½ x 4 ½-inch bar. Stitch on the line, chain-piecing method. Press. Open and trim center layer of fabric with scissors, leaving a ¼-inch seam. Press again. Repeat with left side for each flying geese unit. Make six.

Assembly:

Lay out block according to picture. Starting with the first column on the left, stitch the tree top to the trunk. Press to the trunk. Add the 4 ½ inch sky to the tree top. Press to the sky.

Likewise, make the second tree and then add the 4 ½ x 1 ½-inch sky. Press to the sky.

Stitch columns one and two together. Press open. Stitch the 4 ½ x 8 ½-inch sky to the top of this section.

Make the third tree using the same technique. Stitch the third column to the first section. Press open. Stitch the 1 ½ x 12 ½-inch sky to the top of the block.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

Click here: River Heritage Month 9 Tree Line for a printer-friendly version!

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Congratulations! You have completed all nine blocks for River Heritage! Setting instructions will be posted on October 8th at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Friendship, Laughter & Quilts–Oh My!

Once a year we head out of town to a cabin in the woods. It’s a deer camp for the hunters in the family. For one week, we “chick” up the place!

Image of Cabin

After cleaning, but before the invasion!

Bring in the tables, machines, fabric, thread, needles and pins, design walls, quilt blocks, music, movies, lights, food, food, more food and, best of all, friends!

Image of Sewing Machine

Featherweight is set up and stitching on night one.

We spend a bit of  time when we arrive to vacuum, mop, disinfect surfaces, wash bedding, and do mouse and spider prevention– because it really is a cabin in the woods!

Read on to share in our adventures which included a low-flying plane, a Polaris ride through the property (with a fortunate ending), limited cell service, a ringed-moon, hooting owl, quilt reveals, sunrises, demos, sunsets, more quilts, a little (wink) Momma Mia, and a lot of laughter.

Image of Quilters Watching Linda.

Linda gives a demo for making clothesline bowls.

Image of Quilters at the Design Wall.

Design work.

 

 

 

We stood in the field at the top of the hill and made an impromtu target for a money/food/water drop with this water bottle as the target. It felt like a scene from Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood. (Can you believe not one thing hit our target?)Image of Feet in a CircleA flyover!Image of Plane

One evening, my hubby gave us a ride through the property – through thorns and briars and overgrown brush – this pic shows the dam which is usually kept cleared.Image of Brush We were truly blazing trails!  This was our view from the dam.Image of Pond

Image of Hanging Quilts

Completed tops hang from the banister.

It was all fun and games until  we broke down – the “fortunate ending” was that the abrupt stop didn’t happen in the middle of nowhere OR in the middle of the briar patch.  A brief, downhill walk back to the truck was welcome!

One morning, about 4:30, Linda and I met in the kitchen and since we were both wide awake, we decided it was time to take the coffee to the porch. The moon had a beautiful red ring around it. We rocked, talked, drank coffee, watched the stars turn into a sunrise, and heard an owl in the tree.

How does Momma Mia fit in? Well, one annoying quilter (there’s always one) couldn’t get “Waterloo” out of her head. Knowing only that word of the song, that’s all she would sing…over and over until they finally turned on the movie and then NO one could get that or any of the other songs out of their heads.  Let’s see…”Dancing Queen”,  “Waterloo”, “Super Trouper” “Honey, Honey”, “Momma Mia”, “Money, Money, Money”, “Our Last Summer”…yes, you are all quite welcome for the reminder! (blowing kiss).

We had a wonderful week. I regret we didn’t take more pictures, because, believe it or not, some quilters, quilts, and activities didn’t get photographed!

 

Image of Bear Quilt

Peggy’s Bear Quilt

Image of Beth's Quilt on Design Wall

Beth’s quilt on the design wall.

Image of Sunset

Sunset at the old barn site.

Image of Shelter

The new shelter at the site of the old red barn.

Image of Quilters by Window

Merle and Nancy trying to get cell bars while Mary is hard at work.

Image of Ladies on Porch

Coffee on the porch.

Image of Quilters

Anne, Nancy, and Donna at work.

Sometimes while packing, loading, and unloading soooo many things for a quilt retreat, you start to wonder if it’s worth the effort. Couldn’t I get more done in my own space?
Image of Quilters Working

This is what happens when you play hooky from quilt class!

Yes, probably. But there is something wonderful about being around old friends, making new friends, having limited responsibilities, doing whatever you feel like doing, laughing, sharing–that you can’t do at home stitching alone.
I wish I could share ALL of this with people who ask what I do–quilting is about so much more than what I think they picture. How do you convey the friendship and camaraderie? The creativity and discovery? The laughter and weight gain? (Did I mention that part?) Quilt retreats generally involve a lot of eating.
Speaking of that, I need to end this post so I can swim some laps to try to get back into my pre-retreat clothes! “Back to life…back to reality” (another song for you…by Soul II Soul, 1989) You’re welcome, friends!

Thanks for all the fun and memories!

Read “One Sweet Retreat” HERE

Next week is the final block reveal for River Heritage BOM Mystery Quilt!

 

 

Quilting-Dakota Style

This little guy just made the trip, along with his buddy, Tanka, to two of my favorite places in South Dakota!Image of Turtle Quilt

My daughter’s work at Black Hills Playhouse finished up for the summer so my husband flew out to drive back with her. So, being the great guy that he is, he offered to take my two newest quilts and a stack of patterns with him.

First he went to visit our new friends Kathy and Ernie in Custer SD, at Dakota Dream Bed & Breakfast & Horse Hotel.  We highly recommend a visit to the Black Hills in Custer State Park and a stay with Kathy and Ernie. Learn more HERE.Image of Dakota Dream

Then when Matt and Jacq were homebound, they stopped in The Quilt Shop, Inc. in Chamberlain, SD.  They delivered “Dakota” patterns to owner, Sonya Kroupa (and pick up a piece of fabric for moi)! Sonya has a delightful quilt shop AND more! In addition to rooms and rooms of interesting and different fabric, kits, and patterns, she has local artwork, jewelry, beads – really more than I had time to take in during my two short visits there. Visit The Quilt Shop website HERE.Image of The Quilt Shop, Inc.

Also, see this post which shows more fun things to see in Custer and the Dignity statue in Chamberlain HERE.

About Dakota:

This is another petite design, finishing at 18 x 24 inches. It’s a great “afternoon quilt” – quick and easy. Even after making more than twenty #usebothsides quilts, I can’t decide which is more fun, choosing the focus fabric or the background fabrics. Both are vital to the charm of the quilts!

The southwest focus fabric was an awesome piece to use. I loved the rich mix of background fabrics, including several feather fabrics. Image of Turtle Quilt
Imagine all the different “turtle “fabrics you could use!  It could be playful with children’s motifs, realistic with mottled dotty fabric, wild with large florals or geometrics – really anything will work as long as the reverse passed the audition!

Read about Tanka quilt pattern HERE!Image of Bison Quilt Closeup

Wild West Quilts

Thinking caps, please…

South Dakota, wildlife everywhere, incredible terrain, bison strolling along the roadside, animal skulls…this isn’t some cutesy butterfly pattern I’m introducing…in fact, it took this Southeast Missouri girl some time to wrap her head around it…

…but with the right fabrics – WOW! I’m diggin’ this bison skull quilt pattern. I hope you are, too!Image of Bison Skull Quilt

As many of you know from “South Dakota Quilts & More” (click here), our recent trip to the Black Hills Playhouse in Custer State Park included some fun sights, statues, monuments and, of course, quilt shops.

Tanka is the first pattern in what I call my “Out West” series.

Tanka, in Lakota, means “big, great”.

I chose feathers on a light background for the focus fabric. The skull is made from the reverse side of it and the hanging feather decoration is cut from the front. The background fabrics for this quilt were really fun to play with! Don’t you just love that black and white fence row fabric at the bottom? I found it and “several” other fabulous fabrics at The Quilt Shop in Chamberlain, SD.Image of Bison Quilt Closeup

A fun element of making these quilts is mixing up the background fabrics. This one has batik, southwest, gold circles on gray (but reversed), grunge and a fur look to really give interest to the quilt.

It’s so much fun to #usebothsides of fabrics and it’s a great way to learn about the nuances of value. You won’t look at fabric the same way again! AND when you use both sides, you DOUBLE your stash! Give it a try!

If you like the wildlife theme, hang on! There’s some really fun ones in the thinker and on the design wall!

Shop HERE for #usebothsides patterns.

Don’t forget about Jack (buck), made with Mossy Oak camouflage fabric!

Choose the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt page for the latest block. Only one to go!

Can you guess what the next #usebothsides pattern will be?

 

River Heritage – Hovering Hawks

Hovering Hawks is the eighth block in our mystery quilt, River Heritage. As you know, most of the blocks in this quilt are classics. Such is the case with this one. Image of Hovering Hawks Month

The Hovering Hawks quilt block has been around a long, long time. There’s an interesting history lesson by Barbara Brackman HERE about the block and it’s symbolic meaning with the civil war.

I think you’ll find this quilt fun to make.  You’ll arrange half-squares with single blocks, so piecing will be easy. The challenge for me was deciding where to place my fabrics.

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 8 Hovering Hawks

Welcome to the eighth month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt!

 Hovering Hawks is made from sixteen squares, ten of them made from half-square triangles. This block has been made over the years using lots of different fabric and value combinations. I played with my fabrics quite a while before making my final choices for this block.  Use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions: 

From light fabric:                                         From dark or medium fabric:                                

Five – 4-inch squares                                      Five – 4-inch squares

Four – 3 ½-inch squares                                Two – 3 ½ inch squares

 

RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the five light squares. Layer one dark/medium 4-inch square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to

 3 ½ inches. Makes ten half-square triangle sets. 

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen squares according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows to the right, even rows to the left.

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press.

Repeat with the final two columns, stitch and press.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

 

Click here for printer-friendly version: River Heritage Month 8 Hovering Hawks

Photographing actual hovering hawks proved to be quite a challenge. First, from what I’ve read, the red-tailed hawk which is likely what lives here might not even hover. They might be doing something that appears to be a hover, but, according to the experts, isn’t actually a hover. Image of Hawk

Also, I could only find single hawks hovering/not hovering. Any grouping of birds that I thought might be hawks were actually turkey buzzards. So, kinda like the glimmer of “river” in “Eagle’s Nest”, we’re gonna say this is a hawk and it is HOVERING! Have fun with this block!

Month Nine will be posted on September 10, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com

Click on the tab above for all the block posts for River Heritage.

Check out the new patterns in my #usebothsides patterns in my ETSY SHOP HERE!

Sunrise Quilts

The morning was crisp and the air wet. Steam was rising off the pool water. The sun hadn’t peaked over the ridge yet, but the birds were singing from all directions. I could still hear some lingering locusts in the woods. I grabbed my favorite “pool quilt” and a cup of hot coffee in my favorite mug. My bible opened to Psalms. Image of Dawn by the Pool

My days always go better when I start them this way. It’s one reason I love summer so much!

Everything about the day-the challenges, the frustrations, even the joys and opportunities-gets put into perspective when I consider the majesty and power of God and the unbelievable sacrifice of Christ on my behalf.

Image of Quilt by Pool

Read Summer Quilting HERE. (THAT pool is in Pensacola!)

My “pool quilt” is one I made from a fat quarter collection on a background of fabric from JoAnn’s that looks like the bottom of the pool when I’m swimming laps on a sunny day. I saw that fabric and just had to have it (I think some of you might understand that)! My intention was to actually finish the quilt in the shape of our pool which is a curvy, figure-eight shape. That was too difficult and would have wasted too much fabric, so it’s just a rectangle and I love it. It’s not show worthy, but it’s soft and yummy.

I have a bible app on my phone that gives me a new scripture each day. I chuckled when I read that there is “a time to sew” – I actually thought it was a misspelling at first, thinking it should be “sow”.
Then I realized it was from a later verse in the chapter and my version usually used the word “mend”. Of course, I’m thinking, “how appropriate”. Then I read the rest of the verse…hmmm…yeah, that’s probably the message I needed to hear:

To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: (7) A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;  Ecclesiastes 3:1,7 KJV

A time to keep silence.

What’s your favorite way to start your day?

Click on the tab above for the FREE River Heritage Mystery Quilt Blocks! Next block comes out on August 13th!

SHOP my patterns at www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios 

 

 

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