Creative Bee Studios

Sweet Ideas for Creative Minds

River Heritage – Hovering Hawks

Hovering Hawks is the eighth block in our mystery quilt, River Heritage. As you know, most of the blocks in this quilt are classics. Such is the case with this one. Image of Hovering Hawks Month

The Hovering Hawks quilt block has been around a long, long time. There’s an interesting history lesson by Barbara Brackman HERE about the block and it’s symbolic meaning with the civil war.

I think you’ll find this quilt fun to make.  You’ll arrange half-squares with single blocks, so piecing will be easy. The challenge for me was deciding where to place my fabrics.

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 8 Hovering Hawks

Welcome to the eighth month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt!

 Hovering Hawks is made from sixteen squares, ten of them made from half-square triangles. This block has been made over the years using lots of different fabric and value combinations. I played with my fabrics quite a while before making my final choices for this block.  Use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions: 

From light fabric:                                         From dark or medium fabric:                                

Five – 4-inch squares                                      Five – 4-inch squares

Four – 3 ½-inch squares                                Two – 3 ½ inch squares

 

RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the five light squares. Layer one dark/medium 4-inch square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to

 3 ½ inches. Makes ten half-square triangle sets. 

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen squares according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows to the right, even rows to the left.

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press.

Repeat with the final two columns, stitch and press.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

 

Click here for printer-friendly version: River Heritage Month 8 Hovering Hawks

Photographing actual hovering hawks proved to be quite a challenge. First, from what I’ve read, the red-tailed hawk which is likely what lives here might not even hover. They might be doing something that appears to be a hover, but, according to the experts, isn’t actually a hover. Image of Hawk

Also, I could only find single hawks hovering/not hovering. Any grouping of birds that I thought might be hawks were actually turkey buzzards. So, kinda like the glimmer of “river” in “Eagle’s Nest”, we’re gonna say this is a hawk and it is HOVERING! Have fun with this block!

Month Nine will be posted on September 10, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com

Click on the tab above for all the block posts for River Heritage.

Check out the new patterns in my #usebothsides patterns in my ETSY SHOP HERE!

Sunrise Quilts

The morning was crisp and the air wet. Steam was rising off the pool water. The sun hadn’t peaked over the ridge yet, but the birds were singing from all directions. I could still hear some lingering locusts in the woods. I grabbed my favorite “pool quilt” and a cup of hot coffee in my favorite mug. My bible opened to Psalms. Image of Dawn by the Pool

My days always go better when I start them this way. It’s one reason I love summer so much!

Everything about the day-the challenges, the frustrations, even the joys and opportunities-gets put into perspective when I consider the majesty and power of God and the unbelievable sacrifice of Christ on my behalf.

Image of Quilt by Pool

Read Summer Quilting HERE. (THAT pool is in Pensacola!)

My “pool quilt” is one I made from a fat quarter collection on a background of fabric from JoAnn’s that looks like the bottom of the pool when I’m swimming laps on a sunny day. I saw that fabric and just had to have it (I think some of you might understand that)! My intention was to actually finish the quilt in the shape of our pool which is a curvy, figure-eight shape. That was too difficult and would have wasted too much fabric, so it’s just a rectangle and I love it. It’s not show worthy, but it’s soft and yummy.

I have a bible app on my phone that gives me a new scripture each day. I chuckled when I read that there is “a time to sew” – I actually thought it was a misspelling at first, thinking it should be “sow”.
Then I realized it was from a later verse in the chapter and my version usually used the word “mend”. Of course, I’m thinking, “how appropriate”. Then I read the rest of the verse…hmmm…yeah, that’s probably the message I needed to hear:

To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: (7) A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;  Ecclesiastes 3:1,7 KJV

A time to keep silence.

What’s your favorite way to start your day?

Click on the tab above for the FREE River Heritage Mystery Quilt Blocks! Next block comes out on August 13th!

SHOP my patterns at www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios 

 

 

Meet Jack-the Deer Quilt

It’s a boy! Jack is the first boy made with both sides of one focus fabric.

I used a Mossy Oak camouflage from my local quilt shop. There are LOTS of camouflage fabrics on the market you could use.

I thought this one a might stiff when I pulled it off the bolt but after a quick wash and dry, it was great to work with!

As I describe in all the #usebothsides patterns, you’ll want to see a good contrast in values (black and white pictures tell the truth) when you choose your focus fabric.

*Full-size paper template.

*Complete, detailed instructions.

*Fast and easy to make.

*Guide for auditioning and choosing your focus and background fabrics.

*Learn the nuances of value while you have fun auditioning both sides of fabric!

Shop Jack and all the #usebothsides patterns HERE!

With fall just around the corner, you might want to get your ghoul on with Something’s Brewing!

South Dakota Quilts & More

Fabulous is the word to describe our trip to Custer, South Dakota! Quilts, quilt shops, a quilt in a musical, quilts at our bed and breakfast, quilts on a monument – what more could a quilter ask for?

Our daughter graduated in May as a musical theatre major and was excited to be hired by Black Hills Playhouse – her first paid gig as a graduate (yes). We knew little about the playhouse or South Dakota, but planned our trip right away when we learned she would play Laurey in OKLAHOMA!

I had no idea the trip would be so quilter friendly!

Dignity is a 50-foot-tall statue in Chamberlain, SD, to honor the cultures of the Dakota and Lakota people. She represents courage, perseverance and wisdom. Made from stainless steel, Dignity wears a Native dress from the 1850s and holds a star quilt made from 128 stainless steel blue diamonds. Dignity was designed by artist laureate Dale Lamphere and gifted to the state of South Dakota by Norm and Eunabel McKie. Learn more about Dignity HERE.Image of Dignity StatueImage of Dignity's Quilt

Just down the road from Dignity in the city of Chamberlain is The Quilt Shop. In addition to several rooms filled with bolt after bolt of beautiful fabric, is the main room featuring a mix of Native American art, jewelry, beads, quilt patterns, kits, laser pre-cuts, panels, and more fabric!

Owner Sonya was friendly and helpful, and is now selling #usebothsides patterns in her shop! Check out her website HERE.

Image of Bison

A partial herd of bison “greeted” us when we entered The Black Hills.

The South Dakota landscape is diverse and amazing. First up was a drive through the Badlands.

Image of Badlands, SD

The Badlands, South Dakota

There were bison statues all through the town of Custer, too – of course I had to share the one with the quilt.Image of Bison Statue with Quilt

Check out this bison following us on the road (view is from inside our Tahoe).Image of Bison on Road

Taking this long of a trip to see a show, we didn’t see it just once (three times) and we didn’t stop smiling, even to the end of the third show!

 

 

 

Image of Black Hills Playhouse

Click here for more info on BHP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s amazing that this quaint theater tucked in the hills has such a dedicated following, especially when you see the roads people travel to get to it! At least the first three shows were sold out. The energy level of the cast was high, the performances perfected, the direction was unique and solid (not that I’m an expert at ALL, but I know what I like) and the SOUND…I could hear every word. It was a wonderful experience. Everything you would expect from a professional playhouse.

OKLAHOMA! runs through July 29th and then they open The Game’s Afoot on August 3rd!
Image of Curly and Laurey

Curly and Laurey played by Lukas Ptacek and Jacquelyn Kiefner

Image of Ado Annie and Star Quilt

Ado Annie – “I’m just a girl who cain’t say no!” Played by Josey Miller.

See  more incredible photos by Sage Studios Professional Photography on their Facebook Page HERE or go to their website HERE. He really captured the moments and the energy-even the rice toss the moment before the lights went out at the end of the show.

 

 

The star quilts took on significance for the Sioux and Assiniboine when buffalo was pushed to near extinction and hides and robes were no longer given as honors. Also known as the Star of Bethlehem, the pattern is also featured in quill work, bead work and paintings.

Image of Mt. Rushmore

Mount Rushmore

Image of Crazy Horse Mock Up

Mock Up of Crazy Horse Memorial

We got to spend part of one day with our daughter and took in Crazy Horse and Mount Rushmore!

Image of Kathy and Ernie

Owners Kathy and Ernie, Dakota Dream

Last, but certainly NOT least to share about our trip, was the warm welcome we received at Dakota Dream Bed & Breakfast & Horse Hotel. Kathy and Ernie were delightful hosts and, I’m telling you, they thought of EVERY thing to make our stay special! We highly recommend! Even after day three, I was still finding little things they did to provide all the comforts, well, beyond OUR home!

Learn more about Dakota Dream HERE!

Image of Breakfast Plate

Every breakfast was a work of art.

Image of Quilt

Kathy’s a quilter, too!

Image of Matt and Karla at Dakota Dream

Me and the hubbs.

Subscribe below for weekly posts! Share your summer travels in the comments below!

Shop patterns HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Sandy, the Sea Turtle Quilt

Sandy, the sea turtle pattern is for those who love summer at the beach… the sand, the salty air, the sound of sea gulls and crashing waves and, of course, sea turtles!  Image of Sea Turtle Quilt by Water

In the warm summer sand, a momma sea turtle digs her nest. This becomes home for up to a hundred eggs for the next sixty days. Like the temperature of the sand determines the gender of the sea turtles, your focus fabric will decide yours! Image of Sandy Pattern

Did you know? Cooler sand temperatures produce more male and warmer sand produces more female sea turtles.

The sea turtle eggs hatch almost simultaneously, making the sandy nest look like boiling water. Instinctively, the babies find their way to the water with the help of the slope of the beach and the moon and star reflections on the water.

The large number of turtles hatching and moving to the sea all together helps protect them from predators. That’s why its a good idea to remove chairs and umbrellas and fill all holes at night during hatching season so they have a better chance at making it to sea safely.

How it works: Value. Choose a focus fabric with a great reverse. (You’ll know it when you see it, you really will!) Make sure you can see the difference in value by taking a black and white picture. Tips for auditioning focus and background fabric are included in each #usebothsides pattern.

Full-size paper template included in each pattern.

Shop for Sandy on www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios

Image of Sea Turtle Quilt on Clothesline Prairie Point Hanging Method instructions included.

Shop all my patterns HERE

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River Heritage – Eagle’s Nest

Get a bird’s-eye view from Inspiration Point and Month Seven in the River Heritage BOM mystery quilt block: Eagle’s Nest.Image of Month Seven Ad

This is one of my favorite blocks!  It has a few more pieces and variety than the last two month’s blocks. This block has a nine-patch in the center which is set on-point and is surrounded by flying geese sections. Like the “inspirational” pictures accompanying this post, this block will have a high perch in the River Heritage quilt setting.

Inspiration Point, in the rolling hills of the Shawnee National Forest, provides a breathtaking panoramic view of the Mississippi River valley. It is located about 30 miles from Cape Girardeau, MO, near Wolf Lake, Illinois.

Image of Rock Cliffs

Approaching Inspiration Point

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Love the reflection of the tree below.

The hike to the viewing rocks is short and pleasant from the upper lot. (The lower lot looks like a pretty tough climb.) If we hadn’t seen people on the rocks, I’m not sure we would have ventured out to them, but the path isn’t as treacherous as it looked from the trail. (I don’t advise taking little ones as there are no safety rails.)Image of Adjacent RocksImage of Rocks

Image of Matt and View

My darling hubby taking me on another adventure to get pictures for River Heritage.

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Somewhere in the distance, one of those glimmers of water is the mighty Mississippi River, I am SURE of it! Since we made the trip and the climb to get these pictures for Eagle’s Nest, despite a bit of fear on my part (snakes and heights), we are going to go with it!Image of Eagle's Nest Block

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 7 Eagle’s Nest

Welcome to the seventh month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Eagle’s Nest has lots of pieces, but they are not difficult to make. If you go one section at a time, you’ll master what might appear to be the most difficult block in the quilt, first time around! Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

For center nine-patch:                                              For cornerstones:                                         

Five dark 2 5/8” squares                                             Four light 2” squares

Four light 2 5/8” squares

 

For triangle points:                                                   For flying geese border:

Two medium 5 3/8” squares, cut diagonally              Twelve light 2 x 3 ½” bars

Sixteen dark 2” squares

RST = right sides together

Nine-patch: Lay out squares according to picture. Chain-piece column 2 on column 1, RST, pressing the top row to the right, middle row to the left, bottom row to the right. Repeat by adding column 3 to column 2, RST.  Turn top row down onto middle row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open. Repeat by turning assembly onto bottom row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open.

Add points: Fold each triangle in half and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the center. Likewise, fold each side of the nine-patch and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the centers. Match a triangle center with a nine-patch center, RST, pin, and stitch. Press towards the triangle. Repeat for other three sides. Trim and square to 9 ½ inches.

Outer Border: Draw a line from corner to corner on the wrong side of each 2-inch square. Make flying geese by laying the square on the right side of a 2 x 3 ½ inch bar, with the drawn line starting in the center of the bar and going downward to the right. Stitch on the line. Press. Open the layers and trim the center layer using scissors, leaving about a ¼-inch seam. (This leaves the original rectangle and the new triangle on top.) Repeat process for the left side of the bar. Trim/square if necessary to 2 x 3 ½ inches (same as the original bar size). Make eight.

Assemble block: Lay out flying geese, bars, and corner squares around the center block according to the picture. Stitch one flying geese on each side of one bar. Press to the bar. Make four sets. Now add corner squares, one on each end of two sets. Press to the squares.

Pin sets without squares to left and right sides of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open. Pin sets with corner squares to the top and bottom of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 7 Eagle’s Nest (printer-friendly version)

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Eight will be posted on August 13, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Subscribe below to catch all the buzz! Check out my Etsy Shop: CreativeBeeStudios (click here). Bubbles pattern is now available! #usebothsidesImage of Whale Quilt

 

 

 

Patriotic Decorating with Quilts

“Are you a quilter?” has no one said ever when they walked through my front door. I kinda, sorta display quilts all throughout my house. Only when I see my house through a none-quilter’s eyes do I realize the plethora of quilts on display!

Sometime’s there is the fleeting thought…do I have a problem?  Bloop, its gone! That is why I surround myself with fellow quilters–if I have a problem, they do, too!

Image of Patriotic Quilt and Crosses

Nancy’s quilt with the Wall of Crosses.

If you’ve been following my blog for a few months, you’ll know that I recently lost my dad, a World War II vet. I hosted the memorial open house in his honor and had the task of decorating. Patriotic decor was an easy choice. I asked my friend Nancy to bring her patriotic quilts and between the two of us, we decorated an entire fellowship Image of Flag Quilthall! Who knew we had that many quilts of one genre. Here are just a few pics:Image of Three Quilts on TablesImage of Quilt and Lantern

Image of Quilt of Valor

Dad’s Quilt of Valor on display.

And here is Liberty, a #usebothsides quilt decorating my house.Image of Lighthouse Quilt  Click HERE for the pattern and focus fabric kit.

I had a friend ask me once where I will hang all of my #usebothsides quilts in my house?  I’d need another HOUSE! (There are sixteen patterns now and two more on the way coming soon!)

How do you decorate with quilts? Leave a comment below.

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Looking for the River Heritage Mystery Quilt blocks? Click on the tab at the top of my blog!

Quilting with Etsy

If you are like me, sometimes you’d like to wear a button: “I’d rather be quilting”.

Let’s face it, quilting is time consuming. When I’m doing something else, like laundry, housework, or computer-work, it doesn’t really count in my mind as being productive. Those are just things I have to do…like buying tires.

So, I get it when some quilters aren’t familiar or comfortable with on-line shopping sites — because each one takes time to learn and can keep us from essential stitching time.

Maybe this little five-point guide to Etsy can save a quilter some time while introducing some fun quilting options. I’ll use my own shop for the examples.

Five things to know about Etsy:

*Etsy is an online global marketplace for all kinds of unique goods. It features handmade items, supplies,  or vintage goods from little shops from all around the world.

Image of Etsy Shop

Search for Creative Bee Studios

*Etsy is easy to use. Simply type the name of the shop you are looking for in the search bar, like this   “Creative Bee Studios”

 

or use key words to describe an item you are looking for, i.e  “Seahorse Quilt Pattern”.

Image of Etsy Search Results

Search for Seahorse Quilt Pattern

 

 

*When you find something you like, click on the heart and it becomes a favorite of yours. All of your favorite items and shops are accessible through the simple “Favorites” button. You can to browse a feed that Etsy provides based on your searches and your favorites.

 

*Purchasing on Etsy is easy and safe. The Etsy company handles the monetary transaction completely, so the shopowner never gets your payment information. For example, when someone places an order in my shop, I only get that person’s name and shipping address so that I can fill their order. That makes Etsy a place where you can shop online at many different boutiques while only providing your payment information to one company.

 

You can also easily read reviews to see how other customers like a shop and the goods they’ve received. This is highly motivating for shop owners since they only want top ratings and reviews. You are sure to get good service!Image of Shop Reviews

*Quilters can shop for all things quilty–kits, patterns, fabric, notions, fusibles–all kinds of goodies,  from Wonder Clips to Featherweights, even quilting themed clothing to quilt in!

Click right HERE to give Etsy a try!
You can go to my Etsy shop by clicking HERE.

Subscribe below to get the latest buzz once a week, straight to your mailbox (virtual mailbox – also known as email).

Join the FREE River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt — See all the posts by clicking here.

 

 

Introducing…Bubbles & Bonus Tips

You might think that once you’ve chosen a good focus fabric, your work at auditioning fabric is done. But really, you’ve just begun to have fun!

Background fabrics for these quilts are really what make the quilts sing! If you’ve been in one of my classes you know there is a certain “feel” you are trying to achieve in the relationship between your focus and background fabrics.

It DOES truly begin with your focus fabric choice – you have to pick that first and foremost. (I’ll discuss focus fabric auditioning in an upcoming post. Tips for choosing focus fabric are included in each pattern.) Once your focus fabric has been chosen, you want to achieve a balance between your focus fabric and your backgrounds.  I encourage using a mix of fabric styles and to use this quilt as an opportunity try something new. I figure, it IS a fun quilt– so use fun fabrics  which may not be appropriate in your more serious quilt work. I’m going to use two quilts as examples. They just happen to me my first and my latest (not last) patterns:

Notice that the bee is made from very bold fabric. She really makes a statement. She’s not one bit shy. The background fabrics can be bolder for her because her focus fabric and her character allow it. When I take a black and white picture of Phoebee, some of the backgrounds are darker in value than I would use with my other patterns, depending not just on the focus fabric, but also the subject matter and what I want you to feel when you look at the quilt.

Now looking at Bubbles, I hope you see a sweet, endearing “fellow”…youthful, happy, maybe adventuresome… maybe up to something. Bubbles can be a boy or a girl and you can change his or her attitude just by choosing a different focus fabric! What I am hoping you have noticed by now is that the background fabrics also have a different feel. In fact, most of the accent strips I used  are reversed to keep them from overpowering this sweet whale friend.

Once I’ve chosen my focus fabric, I lay the fabric out, loosely shaped for the pattern I’m making– but with a twist – literally, I twist the fabric so half of the fabric shows the reverse side. Then I take my backgrounds and audition them with BOTH sides of my focus fabric, taking lots of black and white pictures until I’m happy with the values I see. When I look at those pictures, I want to see my character (bee, butterfly, bouquet, cauldron, seahorse) first, my reversed fabrics next (flowers, vase, bubbles, etc.), and my backgrounds last. The accent strips are just that – small bits of fun that flirt with being “too much”, but because they are small enough, they can stay and add interest to the quilt.
My husband and “silent” business partner just happened to name the two above quilts.

Now compare the FEELS of these two quilts with relation to their backgrounds:

Image of Flamingo Quilt

Fiona

Now, you don’t want to get too serious about your fabric auditioning, because these patterns truly are fun, fast, and easy quilts to make. There are no matching seams. They are a good way to use up scraps. They make great gifts. I just wanted to give you a little bonus peek into the value of the #usebothsides backgrounds.

For more auditioning fun, take a #usebothsides class. Next up is “Christmas in July” at The Golden Needle in Cape Girardeau, MO. July 7, 10 – 3 p.m. Choose from Pepita, Rose, Emily or Kate. Sign up and prep info in shop.

Bubbles may be my latest#usebothsides pattern, but it is the fourteenth pattern using a scrappy 36-inch square background. See all my patterns by clicking on the Patterns Page above or click here.

 

River Heritage – Port and Starboard

Quilts Ahoy! Month six in our river-themed mystery quilt is called Port and Starboard.Image of River Heritage Ad

I knew from Girl Scout days and canoeing that port meant left (both words have four letters) and Starboard meant right when looking out the front of your boat, vessel, canoe, ship, or even kayak, I guess. What I didn’t know was how those terms came to be.  Here’s what I found out:

When boats were controlled by a steering oar (before the rudder was centered on the boat), it was usually on the right side of the stern. Sailors would call that side the “steering side” and eventually it became a combination of two Old English words: “steor”  and “bord”, which mean “steer” and “side of the boat”. 

The opposite, or left side, of the boat was usually used for docking and loading the boat and was known as the “larboard”. Apparently, “larboard” was too easily confused with “starboard”, so the term “port” was adopted to refer to the side that faced the porters who loaded (ported) supplies onto the boat.

So there you have it: Port and Starboard.Image at Ferry Dockign

Image of Elmer Wichern

Uncle Elmer.

Now for the ferry! While brainstorming for ways to photograph the river for this fun mystery adventure, I thought of the ferry crossing in Ste. Genevieve. I have vague memories of crossing the ferry as a kid and I knew my Uncle Elmer piloted the ferry for a number of years. My cousin, Bonnie, shared with me that he and 4 other men purchased the ferry in 1975 to keep it running for farmers who lived in Ste. Genevieve and farmed in Illinois. He would pilot the boat on the weekends during his retirement.  Uncle Elmer loved the river and spent a lot of time there. If my Aunt Alice didn’t know where he was, she could find him at the river talking to fishermen and farmers. Before he married Aunt Alice, he was a river boat pilot pushing barges from St. Louis to New Orleans. Image of Young Man Working the RiverNow his grandson, Jeff, pushes barges from Tower Rock in Ste. Gen. down the river as far as New Orleans.

Elmer’s younger brother, Bill (my dad), also worked the river as a young man. The only story I remember from my dad about working on the river is that once while in New Orleans he got an anchor tattood on his arm–and a lot of trouble from his siblings when he got home! I loved that anchor tattoo.

Image of Orville Wichern

My dad.

Image of River Crossing

The Ste. Gen – MoDoc River Ferry Summer hours  (April 1 – October 31):
Monday – Saturday: 6 am – Last run at 5:30pm; Sunday : 9 am – Last run at 5:30pm
There are different rates for pedestrian, horseback, bicycles, motorcycles, and different size vehicles plus you can choose round trip or one-way. It was a lot of fun and I recommend it! Click here for more information.Image of River Image of Ferry Piloting across River

                                                  River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 6 Port and Starboard

Welcome to the sixth month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Port and Starboard is made from sixteen half-square triangles squares, like Trail of Tears, but with a different layout. Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. You can use as few as three different fabrics or as make your block as scrappy as you like. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

From light fabric:                                         From dark fabric:                                        Image of Quilt Block

Eight– 4-inch squares                                     Four – 4-inch squares

From medium fabric:

Four – 4-inch squares

RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the eight light squares. Layer one dark square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other three dark/light pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches. Makes eight sets.

 

Repeat the above method using medium/light combination to make eight sets. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches.

 

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen half-square triangles according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.Image of Black and White Port and Starboard Block

 

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows to the right, even rows to the left.

 

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press.

Repeat with the final two columns, stitch and press.

 

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 6 Port and Starboard Printer-FriendlyImage of Vehicle on Ferry

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Seven will be posted on July 9, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

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