I first fell in love with light-weight fusible when I applied Mistyfuse to fabric for use with shaped rulers.

That’s how I made this quilt.

Image of Quilt at Beach

Water Colours

I love that it is like a weightless “spiderweb” of glue. It is so soft, your machine won’t even know it is there. However, there is no paper on this fusible and that caused serious limitations for my use of it. I do a lot of fusible applique which require tracing a template.

My favorite paper-backed fusible is SoftFuse because it is lightweight like Mistyfuse. I recommend Softfuse for students making #usebothsides patterns (click here to see patterns)

So when I heard about this method of transferring a design to fabric with Mistyfuse, I wanted to check it out. Here’s what I learned…

First draw or trace your design with lead pencil onto parchment paper. You need to make it dark. I used a #2 lead pencil.

Then cut a piece of Mistyfuse large enough to cover your design. Using a protective sheet (I used a Goddess Sheet), press the Mistyfuse to the wrong side of your fabric. The Goddess Sheet give the Mistyfuse a sheen so you can see where it is on your fabric.Image of Bee TracingImage of Goddess Sheet Packaging

Mistyfuse on FabricLet it cool and then lay the fabric, fusible side up, on a hard surface. Lay your parchment paper, design side down, on your fabric and trace the design with a hard pointed object. I used a stylist tool. I peeked to make sure the design was showing before I moved the tracing.

Cut your design on the lines.

What I learned…

Don’t trace onto the right side of your fabric. I had to redo my bee after I made that mistake.

The lead markings transfer much easier onto the Mistyfuse than they do directly onto fabric.  The finer your pencil, the finer your lines. I over-did my lead tracing because I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to see it. I could actually use a finer point and get a more precise drawing than I anticipated.

When you need an alternative to paper-backed fusible, this is a great option!Image of Fabric Bee

Image of Deer Mount Quilt

Jack Quilt Pattern

Got a favorite cabin or lodge to decorate? Here is Jack (buck)! He’s made with both sides of Mossy Oak fabric on a scrappy background. Click HERE for the #usebothsides pattern.