Creative Bee Studios

Sweet Ideas for Creative Minds

Category: Quilts (page 1 of 7)

River Heritage – Trail of Tears

River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month Five – Trail of Tears

 

The Trail of Tears State Park, located on the Mississippi River, in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, is a beautiful park with four trails, three river overlooks, a lake, campsites, picnic areas, and a visitor’s center. It  also is a burial site which commemorates the tragic deaths and hardships of the forced relocation of the Cherokee.

Image of River View

View of the Mississippi River from Trail of Tears State Park.

Image of Cherokee on Trail of Tears

The visitor’s center is filled with information including audio recordings, video presentations, books, and static displays about the Trail of Tears, plus information about wildlife found in the area.

 

It is difficult to read, see, and hear about the struggle of these people at the hands of our government and, consequently, our country.  Still, it is wonderful to have the history and beauty of the state park right here in our own “backyard”.  If you haven’t been to the Trail of Tears State Park in a while, I recommend the drive, the views, and the history lesson.Image of Trail of Tears SignImage of Mississippi River

Image of Stone

Later found to have inaccuracies, this covered stone still stands to honor all those who endured the march of relocation on the Trail of Tears.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image of Quilt BlockThe Trail of Tears quilt block is made from sixteen half-square triangle squares (eight made from a dark/light combination and eight made from a medium/light combination).

Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.  I look forward to seeing the variety of blocks you make!

Cutting Instructions:

From two light fabrics:                                             From dark fabric:                                        

Four – 4-inch squares, totaling 8                        Four – 4-inch squares

 

From medium fabric:

Four – 4-inch squares

                                                                                               RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the eight light squares. Layer one dark square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other three dark/light pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches. Makes eight sets. 

Repeat the above method using medium/light combination to make eight sets. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches.

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen half-square triangles according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows (1 & 3) to the right, even rows (2 & 4) to the left.

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press. Now you have two columns.

Repeat the above assembly with the final two columns, stitch and press.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 5 Trail of Tears (Printer Friendly Version)

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Six will be posted on June 11, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Image of BeeIf you visit the Trail of Tears Visitor Center soon, you may experience the carpenter bees working at the entrance. While their buzzing is loud, they aren’t aggressive at all and are too busy making holes in the soft wood to bother you. It’s kind cool and I had to get a picture of one to share, because…you know. 🙂

Subscribe for posts to come to your email. Please share the mystery with friends – it’s not too late to start!

Welcome the latest #usebothsides pattern: Angelina!

Introducing…Angelina

Pointe shoes are just…beautiful. This #usebothsides quilt pattern is for the ballerina in your life.Image of Pointe Shoe Quilt

Angelina Ballerina is a cute little mouse who loves to go to ballet lessons. Part of the American Girl collection, we had (er, still have) the dolls, her stage with a player piano, and many accessories. And…Angelina wore pointe shoes.Image of Mouse Doll

Both of our daughters loved ballet…but I’m not sure either of them would have stayed with it if they’d ever thought pointe shoes were off the table.

Pointe was the point!

I was excited to find focus fabric which works for a new #usebothsides quilt pattern with pointe shoes as the focus! I did my research and then checked with my youngest who is still taking  pointe  (as a senior in college) to make certain the  shoes in my pattern  were properly on pointe!

Angelina Quilt Pattern uses both sides of one focus fabric for the shoes and ribbons, tights and soles (reversed), and the binding on a fun, scrappy background.

Image of Paige

Paige, 2011

Pointe isn’t all glamour and glory, though. Mom’s of pointe students are well aware of the time spent stitching in ribbons and elastic. Girls generally never outgrow point shoes because they break down too quickly and must be replaced often. They take special fittings and there are hundreds of options from which to choose.

Image of Jacq on Pointe

Jacquelyn 2018

For the young dancer, pointe shoes seem to be a right of passage. It takes determination, maturity, time, and skill…and the acceptance of bloody toes, ugly feet, and a large collection of expensive and eventually smell shoes!

Determined girls wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

See all the #usebothsides patterns HERE.

Angelina Quilt Pattern and Focus Fabric Kit now available at www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios!

How do YOU Quilt Week?

..drool over the quilts …view the vendors …proceed with a plan …hit it haphazardly

…all of the above?

We start with a plan each year. Some years we really study the quilts. Some years we REALLY shop the vendors.  Some years we take classes. Some years we throw our plans  out the window and just go!

Of course, this year I made several stops into Hancock’s of Paducah!

Thanks for everyone who took the time to take a pic and post it with #usebothsides! You were entered into the drawing and the winner of a #usebothsides pattern of her choice is…

(drum roll and scroll down)…

 

Image of Quilt Shop

Rose, Pepita, and Emily hang in the distance.

Image of Quilts Hanging

L to R: Sally, Kate, Lily, Belle, Phoebee, Something’s Brewing, and Fiona hanging at Hancock’s of Paducah!

Image of Jacket

That’s me looking at Phoebee and Pepita patterns hanging in Hancock’s.

Image of Hancock's Post

Fiona was a featured quilt in Hancock’s of Paducah Facebook Promotion.

All the names went into the honey pot and the winner is….Image of Honey Pot

Cindy Spaeth! Congrats, Cindy! Pick your pattern, girl!

How do you Quilt Week? What’s your favorite vendor? Favorite quilt? Favorite food?

Shop all the #usebothsides quilts HERE. New focus fabrics and patterns arriving real SOON!

 

 

 

 

Favorite Binding Tool

As a new quilter (and even as a more experienced, but less prolific quilter), I would struggle with attaching binding to my quilts.

I’d refer to my Happy Endings book each time I came to that part of the quilt-making process and try to remember how to prepare and put on binding. Even after I understood the technique, there would be so much time in between bindings that I couldn’t remember how to do it. Image of Rule 'n Gauge Tool

While trying to get the end my stitching to the exact size of my seam allowance, I’d use a familiar tool, mostly used in garment construction.  One brand calls it a “Rule ‘n Gauge”. In addition to providing a precise measurement, I use the straight edge of this little tool to give me a perfectly square fold for my binding corners. While any straight edge will do, this is a thin and readily available tool that has passed the test of time for me. Image of Quilt Binding

Having made 14 patterns in nine months, stitching on binding is second nature to me, but I still use the Rule ‘n Gauge every time.

What’s your favorite binding tool?

Remember to add prairie points (Click here) for easy hanging options before you turn your binding!

Headed to Paducah for AQS Quilt Week? See you at Hancock’s of Paducah! Take a picture with any or all of the ten #usebothsides quilts and post on Facebook with the hashtag for a chance to win a pattern of your choice!

Image of Bee Quilt

Phoebee Quilt Pattern

Month Four – Lighted Bridge

River Heritage Mystery Quilt continues with Month Four!Image of Month Four Promo

Lighted Bridge

The Bill Emerson cable stay bridge stands over the Mississippi River between Cape Girardeau, Missouri and East Cape Girardeau, Illinois. Opened in 2003, the bridge is a beautiful landmark which thousands of people cross each day. Lighted at night, it is a beautiful  and iconic structure,  especially in the month of October when all the lights are pink for the Pink Up Cape breast cancer awareness campaign. The bridge is 4,000 feet long, 100 feet wide and is illuminated with 140 lights.

 

Lighted Bridge is made of four large flying geese (depicting the lighted cables and their reflection in the river) and three strips (sky, bridge roadway, and water). Image of Quilt BlockFollow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your bridge block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices. I look forward to seeing the variety of bridges we make!

Lighted Bridge uses light fabric for the two bridge cables, medium for the lighted night sky and reflected cables, and dark for the bridge roadway and water.

Cutting Instructions:
From light fabrics:                                                                                                                       From dark fabrics:
Two – 3 ½ x 6 ½ inch rectangles                                                                                                         One – 1 x 12 ½ inch strip for bridge roadway
From medium fabrics:                                                                                                                             Four – 3 ½ inch squares for water
Two – 3 ½ x 6 ½ inch rectangles                                                                                                        One – 3 x 12 ½ inch strip for water
for reflected cables
One – 3 ½ x 12 ½ inch strip for sky
Four – 3 ½ inch squares for sky                                                                                            RST = right sides together

Flying Geese: Draw a diagonal line on the reverse side of the four medium and four dark squares. Position a medium square RST on the corner of a light rectangle. Stitch on the line. Press. Peel back the top triangle of the square you just pressed and trim the middle layer to ¼ inch from the seam to reduce bulk. Repeat this process at the opposite corner of the rectangle. Flying Geese should be 3 ½ x 6 ½ inches. Trim if necessary. Repeat with second light rectangle. Makes two light flying geese.

Align one light flying geese RST on another, making sure they are facing the same direction. Stitch on the right side. Press seam open.

Position a dark square RST on the corner of a medium rectangle. Repeat instructions for Flying Geese above. Repeat with second medium rectangle. Makes two medium flying geese.

Align one medium flying geese RST on another, making sure they are facing the same direction. Stitch on the right side. Press seam open.

Block Assembly:
Refer to the picture to lay pieces in order from top to bottom.
Place medium strip RST on light flying geese. Stitch; press to strip.
Place dark 1-inch strip RST on light flying geese. Stitch; press to strip.
Place dark 3-inch strip RST on bottom of medium flying geese. Stitch; press to strip.
Place medium flying geese on 1-inch strip RST. Stitch; press to strip.
Trim and square block to 12 ½ inches.

Image of Lighted Bridge

View from Red Star Boat Ramp

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Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Five will be posted on May14, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

 

Visit Creative Bee Studios (click here) 

Shop Etsy – Creative Bee Studios (click here)

 

 

Chain-piecing a Quilt Block

When piecing a sampler quilt (like the current River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt), chain piecing individual blocks can save you time and help you stay organized.

Since we have all levels of quilters participating in the mystery, I want to share a technique which would help our newer quilters down the road. Chain-piecing.  It’s something I take for granted now, but I remember the lightbulb going on when I was first taught to chain-piece. Here’s how I approach chain-piecing an individual block (which might just show up down the road (river?) in your mystery quilt).

Have you ever given road directions to someone and said, “It’s not nearly as confusing as it sounds.”? That’s how describing chain-piecing is. Hand’s on, it’s easy to grasp. In words, it seems confusing. Take it a step at a time the first few times and soon you’ll be chain-piecing without even thinking about it.

*Cut and prepare your block pieces. In the example I use here, the block is made from all half-square triangles (HST).

 

*Arrange your block pieces according to the block design. (I like to use my ironing board surface.) If it’s a complicated design, I like to check myself by taking a black and white picture (to see value) to make sure I’ve arranged the pieces correctly.

Image of Quilt Block

This quilt block is made of four rows and four columns.

 

*Notice that there are four rows (left to right) and four columns (top to bottom). Turn each HST in Column 2 over onto the HST to the left, in Column 1, right sides together (RST) as shown.

Image of Chain Piecing a Quilt Block

Turn Column 2 onto Column 1, RST.

Likewise, turn each HST from Column 4 over onto the HST to the left, in Column 3, RST.

 

Layer the sets in order, starting with Row 4 on the bottom, offsetting them to keep them distinctly separate as shown below.

Image of Layered Block Sets

Layer the sets from the bottom up to take to your machine.

Carry them to the machine, keeping them in order.

 

Starting with the top set, stitch along the right edge. 

As you get close to the end of stitching the first set, have the next set ready to slide under the presser foot. (I love using my knee bar for this step.) Stop stitching for a moment before you come off the edge of the first set. Slide the second set just under the foot so that it catches the feed dogs, but isn’t touching the first set and continue stitching. It is okay to have two or three “air” stitches between sets. Repeat this for all the sets.

 

Trim the threads between all the sets, keeping them in order. (Your first set is from Columns 1 & 2 in Row 1 and your last set is from Columns 3 & 4, Row 4.)

Press according to block instructions and arrange them in again, only now you have two columns.

Image of Chain Piecing Technique

Now you have two columns.

Turn Column 2 onto Column 1, RST, for all four rows. Again, layer the four rows with Row 4 on the bottom and Row 1 on the top. Take to the machine and chain piece along the right edges.

Image of Chain Piecing Technique

Turn Column 2 onto Column 1 and stitch.

Clip threads, press, and arrange the rows in order. With the columns complete, you only have four rows left to piece.

Image of Block Rows

Rows 1 is at the top and Row 4 is at the bottom.

Continue by piecing the rows together, turning Row 1 down onto Row 2, RST. Nestle and pins the seams. Repeat for Row 3 and Row 4. Stitch along the top edges.

Trim and press. Now lay the two remaining rows in order. Turn Row 1 down onto Row 2. Nestle and pins the seams. Stitch along the top edge. Trim and press.

Remember to square and trim your block according to instructions.

If you are a new quilter, what techniques are you wanting to learn? If you are an experienced quilter, what are your favorites to share?

Month Four in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt will be revealed on Monday, April 9 at 9 a.m.!Image of Three Quilt Blocks

 

 

Heading to AQS Quilt Week in Paducah? How about stopping in Hancock’s of Paducah? You’ll see TEN #usebothsides hanging there with patterns during the show!

Image of Three Quilts

Phoebee, Belle, and Lily

Image of Three Quilts

Rose, Emily, and Kate

Image of Cauldron Wall Hanging

Something’s Brewing

Image of Seahorse Quilt

Sally Quilt Pattern

Image of Flamingo Quilt

Fiona Quilt Pattern

Image of Poinsettia Quilt

Pepita Quilt Pattern

Yakity Yak – Let’s Talk Backs

Sometimes…er, many times…okaay, MOST of the time the back of my quilt is an afterthought. All of my excitement and energy is focused on the quilt top and when the top is finished, I want to quilt it NOW.Image of Quilt Back

I’ll have fleeting thoughts while stitching the top about what fabric I want on the back, but I’m not the type of quilter who generally purchases my backing ahead of time, unless I’ve purchased a kit.

Being a long-arm quilter, I do keep in mind the color of thread I’ll be quilting my top with because that’s the color I will have in my bobbin.  Beyond that, and especially in the last year, since I’ve knocked out 14 quilt patterns in nine months, time is the biggest factor I considered when choosing a backing.

Maybe that seems haphazard and disorganized, but, on the up-side, I have to say my backings have gotten more interesting in the last year!

Take Something’s Brewing, for example. Definitely time was a factor because it was a seasonal quilt I was designing in the fall. So as to not completely miss out on the current season, I had to get her done! Here’s what I did to use what I had on hand: Instant Bargello.Image of Cauldron Quilt

One of my favorite quilting books is called Instant Bargello by Susan Kisro.Image of Book I grabbed some scraps and did three little columns of that technique which gave me enough width for the backing. It was fun and fast!

Notice the Prairie Point Hanging Method (click here for more information)?

Those prairies points proved a bit sentimental for me because one of the fabrics was a Debbie Mumm which belonged to my mother-in-law, Pat. I have little bits of her fabrics in a lot of my #usebothsides quilts.

Something’s Brewing with the label, too. It just couldn’t be a square label. A shout-out to my friend, Mary, for encouraging me to put a little character into my labels! Notice it’s using the reverse side? (wink)

Do you have interesting back ideas? Please share in the comments section!

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In case you missed it, here is the link for the latest BOM block:Image of Tower Rock on Mississippi River

 

 

14 Ways to Use Both Sides of Fabric

Catch a few announcements, some stats, and snippets of things to come…

Last June I announced the first #usebothsides pattern, Phoebee.Image of Bee Quilt

Next came Belle and Lily and the trio made the Colorful Wings Collection. I’ve taught several classes of these winged gals since then and have another one tomorrow for 15 quilters with the Bootheel Quilters’ Guild.Image of Butterfly QuiltImage of Dragonfly Quilt

Image of Three Quilts on Fence

Phoebee, Belle & Lily

My Etsy shop was launched fall, 2017: www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios

I started shipping patterns all over the United States (and one to Canada)!

Rose was the first pattern in the Colorful Petals series.

I found her focus fabric in Branson, Missouri, as I raced through the shop, pulling out bolts to look at the reverse side while my dh waited in the car.Image of Flower Bouquet Quilt This fabric by Red Rooster was an instant winner! Notice the secondary scroll design that shows on the vase but really not so much on the front of the fabric (left accent strip).

Then came Emily,

Image of Sunflower Bouquet Wall Quilt

with a more rustic pottery vase and Kate, whose vase is perfect for large Kaffe Fassett Collective blooms!Image of Vase and Bouquet Quilt

Image of Three Quilts

Colorful Petals Quilt Patterns

Something’s Brewing was fun to design, using my Accuquilt for quick and easy bubbles (Scan N Cut works well, too). I am especially fond of the Honey Buzzard claw feet. This is the only one of my patterns at this point without a female name…just didn’t seem fair to use someone’s name. 🙂Image of Cauldron Wall Hanging

Next is JOY. She’s the second pattern to use templates instead of the fabric’s flowers for the reverse cutting.Image of JOY Quilt

One of my favorites happened because a quilter signed up for the Colorful Petals class, but wanted to use poinsettia fabric. A vase just wouldn’t do! The reversed fabric on this pot MAKES this quilt!
Image of Poinsettia Quilt

Pepita Quilted Wall Hanging

Around Christmas time, I received my first order from Nancy’s Notions catalog. Phoebee, Belle, and Lily were featured in the next issue!

Next is my Coastal Series which includes a seahorse, a flamingo, and a lighthouse.Image of Seahorse QuiltImage of Lighthouse Quilt

Again I used my Accuquilt GO! circle die for the bubbles on Sally, the seahorse. Fiona’s (flamingo) legs and palm branches are reversed. Liberty, the lighthouse is made with a Kaffe stripe which looks both nautical and patriotic when paired with the patriotic background fabrics. Image of Flamingo Quilt

In February Hancock’s of Paducah began to carry seven of my patterns in their Paducah warehouse store.

Many guild members heading to retreat (32) took their pictures with my patterns and posted them with #usebothsides to be entered into a drawing. One gal even took pics of both sides–of herself!  During retreat I just happened to look at Hancock’s online store and found Phoebee! (She’s international, now!)

Nancy’s Notions placed an order for Rose, Emily, and Kate! Watch for them in a future catalog!

 Phoebee, Belle, Lily, Emily, Kate, Sally, and Pepita will be hanging in the Hancock’s of Paducah store in time for the AQS Quilt Week!

The first petite pattern I designed is called Grace. Image of Grace Quilt Pattern

Introducing pattern number 14: Beatrice

Image of Bunny QuiltBeatrice is made with a twist from the norm: I used the reverse side for the bunny and the front of the fabric for the flowers. She just needed to be a bit sneaky!

Just a couple of hints for patterns in the works: Stick to the pointe and have a whale of a good time! There are more ideas swimming around in my head, just waiting for the right focus fabric to appear! What have you made using both sides?

Along with this review of the fun developments that  have happened in the last 3/4 of a year, I want to thank all of you for your support, especially my family and friends. A special shout out to my local quilt guild – they don’t even moan (out loud) when I stand up for show and tell each month with another one of those both sides quilts – you rock, River Heritage Quilt Guild! I truly appreciate all the support!

Join in the fun of the free River Heritage Mystery Quilt- Month Three:Image of Tower Rock on Mississippi River

 

Month Three BOM Mystery Quilt

The third block of the River Heritage Mystery Quilt is revealed!

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Pictured is Tower Rock (Grand Tower) on the frozen Mississippi River.

This photo, taken by Jake Pohlman in January 2018,  shows people crossing the frozen river to the landmark island and rock formation usually only accessible by land during extreme drought.  Tower Rock is located in the Brazeau Township, Perry County, Missouri, near the town of Wittenberg, Missouri, and across the river from Grand Tower, Illinois. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. Jacques Marquette, a French explorer, mentioned this island in 1673 when he passed by this formation. Tower Rock has been known to instill both fear and poetry in river pilots due to the force of the whirlpool effect the water hitting the formation creates.

Month 3 – Flock of Geese

Welcome to the third month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! A flock of geese is a common sight in our area, especially in the fields adjacent to the river line. Flock of Geese is made with two easy components but, as with Railroad Crossing, it can be used to make a stunning quilt by itself or with a secondary block. As I mentioned in the introduction, I am making my quilt blocks very scrappy, so where it calls for one large dark and one large light square, I make two to achieve a scrappy look. I toss my extra squares in my BOM scrap bin to grab for future blocks.

Flock of Geese uses dark and light fabrics. It is an easy block made with two four-patches of half-square triangles (HS) and two large half-square triangles.

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Cutting Instructions

From light fabrics:                            From dark fabrics:                Image of Flock of Geese Block                      

1 – 7-inch square                                1 – 7-inch square

4 – 4-inch squares                               4 – 4-inch squares

RST = right sides together

 

Draw a diagonal line on the reverse side of the 7-inch and 4-inch light squares. Lay the light squares on the same size dark squares, matching edges, RST. Using a quarter-inch foot, sew ¼ inch on each side from the drawn line. Cut on the line. Press each half square triangle towards the darker fabric. Square/trim each large HS to 6 ½ inches and small HS to 3 ½ inches.

Lay out the pieces according to the block picture. Make four-patches out of the small HS by turning the right-side HS onto the left-side HS, RST. Stitch across the top. Press Row 1 to the right, Row 2 to the left. Flip Row 1 onto Row 2, RST, match seams, and pin. Stitch. Press open. Square/trim to 6 ½ inches.

Flip the top four-patch onto the large HS. Stitch. Press to the HS.

Flip the bottom HS onto the four-patch. Stitch. Press to HS.

Turn the top row down onto the bottom row, RST, match seams, and pin. Stitch across the top. Press four-patches open. Trim the block to 12 1/2 inches.

You have made your Flock of Geese block! Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter! Month Four will be posted on April 9, 2018. Subscribe below to get posts automatically emailed to you!

Quilt Retreat Checklist

Image of Quilters

Read HERE about this Jonas Bluffs Retreat!

 

Quilt retreats are filled with friends, fabric, laughter, and food.

Here’s a quilt retreat checklist – Lady of the Lake style!

Quilt Retreat Packing List
2018 Lady of the Lake Style!

Since each quilt retreat is different (due to location, format, schedules, work stations, and even the people you go with), I’ve decided to share how we do quilt retreat at Kentucky Dam Village, Lady of the Lake style!

We have eight lovely ladies in one cabin. We each set up our work station, stitch a lot, eat a lot, share a lot, and laugh a lot. We schedule our meals and each person provides in some way, either meals or supplies.

This year will be a working retreat for me, but I’m looking forward to working in the company of some of my dearest friends! Hope you get some use from this list and a little insight to dynamics of the Lady of the Lake gals.

Sewing Machine (I take my featherweight) and supplies:

Electrical cord, foot pedal, extra light bulb, manual, bobbins, Q-tips (for cleaning machine, not ears)

General Quilting Supplies:

Seam ripper, scissors, rotary cutter and blades, rulers, cutting mat, iron, pressing surface, tables, electrical cords, extension cords, extra lighting, fabric spray, pins, hand-work supplies, guild directory, ¼” guide and 3M removable double-stick for guide on machine.

Personal Items:
Pajamas, preferred drinks, snacks and food for meals not planned, rice bag for sore muscles, “Oh, Ross!” massager for neck and shoulders (reference Poldark), comfortable clothing, walking shoes, jeans for shopping trips, jacket/sweatshirt, overnight bag/products, Advil, pain relief lotion

My Work Station (while at retreat this year, I’ll be filling orders, designing more patterns, working on our guild’s mystery quilt pattern designing, and attaching labels to #usebothsides quilts):

Personal fireplace heater, saddle chair, templates, blank paper, pencils, computer, keyboard, mouse, and cords, printer and cords, printer paper, batteries, paper cutter, tape, mailing bags, patterns, background fabrics, focus fabrics, fusible, basting glue, applique scissors, Kathy’s quilt, Phoebee, Belle, Lily, Sally, Fiona quilts, phone charger, Fitbit charger, dvd player and exercise mat.

Food:
Ingredients for my assigned meal: Cheesy, Broccoli Potato Soup with salad and bread.
Snacks (chocolate, trail mix, licorice)
Tea and waters
This doesn’t look like much food, but when each quilter brings extra to share, we end up with lots of snacks and never has anyone lost weight on a retreat – except one gal – she was determined!

Quilt retreats are fun, productive, yummy, and tiresome all rolled into one week!

Supply List Printer Format

Click here for #usebothsides quilt patterns!

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