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Category: River Heritage Quilters Guild

River Heritage – Eagle’s Nest

Get a bird’s-eye view from Inspiration Point and Month Seven in the River Heritage BOM mystery quilt block: Eagle’s Nest.Image of Month Seven Ad

This is one of my favorite blocks!  It has a few more pieces and variety than the last two month’s blocks. This block has a nine-patch in the center which is set on-point and is surrounded by flying geese sections. Like the “inspirational” pictures accompanying this post, this block will have a high perch in the River Heritage quilt setting.

Inspiration Point, in the rolling hills of the Shawnee National Forest, provides a breathtaking panoramic view of the Mississippi River valley. It is located about 30 miles from Cape Girardeau, MO, near Wolf Lake, Illinois.

Image of Rock Cliffs

Approaching Inspiration Point

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Love the reflection of the tree below.

The hike to the viewing rocks is short and pleasant from the upper lot. (The lower lot looks like a pretty tough climb.) If we hadn’t seen people on the rocks, I’m not sure we would have ventured out to them, but the path isn’t as treacherous as it looked from the trail. (I don’t advise taking little ones as there are no safety rails.)Image of Adjacent RocksImage of Rocks

Image of Matt and View

My darling hubby taking me on another adventure to get pictures for River Heritage.

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Somewhere in the distance, one of those glimmers of water is the mighty Mississippi River, I am SURE of it! Since we made the trip and the climb to get these pictures for Eagle’s Nest, despite a bit of fear on my part (snakes and heights), we are going to go with it!Image of Eagle's Nest Block

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 7 Eagle’s Nest

Welcome to the seventh month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Eagle’s Nest has lots of pieces, but they are not difficult to make. If you go one section at a time, you’ll master what might appear to be the most difficult block in the quilt, first time around! Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

For center nine-patch:                                              For cornerstones:                                         

Five dark 2 5/8” squares                                             Four light 2” squares

Four light 2 5/8” squares

 

For triangle points:                                                   For flying geese border:

Two medium 5 3/8” squares, cut diagonally              Twelve light 2 x 3 ½” bars

Sixteen dark 2” squares

RST = right sides together

Nine-patch: Lay out squares according to picture. Chain-piece column 2 on column 1, RST, pressing the top row to the right, middle row to the left, bottom row to the right. Repeat by adding column 3 to column 2, RST.  Turn top row down onto middle row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open. Repeat by turning assembly onto bottom row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open.

Add points: Fold each triangle in half and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the center. Likewise, fold each side of the nine-patch and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the centers. Match a triangle center with a nine-patch center, RST, pin, and stitch. Press towards the triangle. Repeat for other three sides. Trim and square to 9 ½ inches.

Outer Border: Draw a line from corner to corner on the wrong side of each 2-inch square. Make flying geese by laying the square on the right side of a 2 x 3 ½ inch bar, with the drawn line starting in the center of the bar and going downward to the right. Stitch on the line. Press. Open the layers and trim the center layer using scissors, leaving about a ¼-inch seam. (This leaves the original rectangle and the new triangle on top.) Repeat process for the left side of the bar. Trim/square if necessary to 2 x 3 ½ inches (same as the original bar size). Make eight.

Assemble block: Lay out flying geese, bars, and corner squares around the center block according to the picture. Stitch one flying geese on each side of one bar. Press to the bar. Make four sets. Now add corner squares, one on each end of two sets. Press to the squares.

Pin sets without squares to left and right sides of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open. Pin sets with corner squares to the top and bottom of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 7 Eagle’s Nest (printer-friendly version)

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Eight will be posted on August 13, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Subscribe below to catch all the buzz! Check out my Etsy Shop: CreativeBeeStudios (click here). Bubbles pattern is now available! #usebothsidesImage of Whale Quilt

 

 

 

River Heritage – Port and Starboard

Quilts Ahoy! Month six in our river-themed mystery quilt is called Port and Starboard.Image of River Heritage Ad

I knew from Girl Scout days and canoeing that port meant left (both words have four letters) and Starboard meant right when looking out the front of your boat, vessel, canoe, ship, or even kayak, I guess. What I didn’t know was how those terms came to be.  Here’s what I found out:

When boats were controlled by a steering oar (before the rudder was centered on the boat), it was usually on the right side of the stern. Sailors would call that side the “steering side” and eventually it became a combination of two Old English words: “steor”  and “bord”, which mean “steer” and “side of the boat”. 

The opposite, or left side, of the boat was usually used for docking and loading the boat and was known as the “larboard”. Apparently, “larboard” was too easily confused with “starboard”, so the term “port” was adopted to refer to the side that faced the porters who loaded (ported) supplies onto the boat.

So there you have it: Port and Starboard.Image at Ferry Dockign

Image of Elmer Wichern

Uncle Elmer.

Now for the ferry! While brainstorming for ways to photograph the river for this fun mystery adventure, I thought of the ferry crossing in Ste. Genevieve. I have vague memories of crossing the ferry as a kid and I knew my Uncle Elmer piloted the ferry for a number of years. My cousin, Bonnie, shared with me that he and 4 other men purchased the ferry in 1975 to keep it running for farmers who lived in Ste. Genevieve and farmed in Illinois. He would pilot the boat on the weekends during his retirement.  Uncle Elmer loved the river and spent a lot of time there. If my Aunt Alice didn’t know where he was, she could find him at the river talking to fishermen and farmers. Before he married Aunt Alice, he was a river boat pilot pushing barges from St. Louis to New Orleans. Image of Young Man Working the RiverNow his grandson, Jeff, pushes barges from Tower Rock in Ste. Gen. down the river as far as New Orleans.

Elmer’s younger brother, Bill (my dad), also worked the river as a young man. The only story I remember from my dad about working on the river is that once while in New Orleans he got an anchor tattood on his arm–and a lot of trouble from his siblings when he got home! I loved that anchor tattoo.

Image of Orville Wichern

My dad.

Image of River Crossing

The Ste. Gen – MoDoc River Ferry Summer hours  (April 1 – October 31):
Monday – Saturday: 6 am – Last run at 5:30pm; Sunday : 9 am – Last run at 5:30pm
There are different rates for pedestrian, horseback, bicycles, motorcycles, and different size vehicles plus you can choose round trip or one-way. It was a lot of fun and I recommend it! Click here for more information.Image of River Image of Ferry Piloting across River

                                                  River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 6 Port and Starboard

Welcome to the sixth month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Port and Starboard is made from sixteen half-square triangles squares, like Trail of Tears, but with a different layout. Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. You can use as few as three different fabrics or as make your block as scrappy as you like. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

From light fabric:                                         From dark fabric:                                        Image of Quilt Block

Eight– 4-inch squares                                     Four – 4-inch squares

From medium fabric:

Four – 4-inch squares

RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the eight light squares. Layer one dark square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other three dark/light pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches. Makes eight sets.

 

Repeat the above method using medium/light combination to make eight sets. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches.

 

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen half-square triangles according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.Image of Black and White Port and Starboard Block

 

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows to the right, even rows to the left.

 

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press.

Repeat with the final two columns, stitch and press.

 

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 6 Port and Starboard Printer-FriendlyImage of Vehicle on Ferry

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Seven will be posted on July 9, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

River Heritage – Trail of Tears

River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month Five – Trail of Tears

 

The Trail of Tears State Park, located on the Mississippi River, in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, is a beautiful park with four trails, three river overlooks, a lake, campsites, picnic areas, and a visitor’s center. It  also is a burial site which commemorates the tragic deaths and hardships of the forced relocation of the Cherokee.

Image of River View

View of the Mississippi River from Trail of Tears State Park.

Image of Cherokee on Trail of Tears

The visitor’s center is filled with information including audio recordings, video presentations, books, and static displays about the Trail of Tears, plus information about wildlife found in the area.

 

It is difficult to read, see, and hear about the struggle of these people at the hands of our government and, consequently, our country.  Still, it is wonderful to have the history and beauty of the state park right here in our own “backyard”.  If you haven’t been to the Trail of Tears State Park in a while, I recommend the drive, the views, and the history lesson.Image of Trail of Tears SignImage of Mississippi River

Image of Stone

Later found to have inaccuracies, this covered stone still stands to honor all those who endured the march of relocation on the Trail of Tears.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image of Quilt BlockThe Trail of Tears quilt block is made from sixteen half-square triangle squares (eight made from a dark/light combination and eight made from a medium/light combination).

Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.  I look forward to seeing the variety of blocks you make!

Cutting Instructions:

From two light fabrics:                                             From dark fabric:                                        

Four – 4-inch squares, totaling 8                        Four – 4-inch squares

 

From medium fabric:

Four – 4-inch squares

                                                                                               RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the eight light squares. Layer one dark square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other three dark/light pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches. Makes eight sets. 

Repeat the above method using medium/light combination to make eight sets. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches.

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen half-square triangles according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows (1 & 3) to the right, even rows (2 & 4) to the left.

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press. Now you have two columns.

Repeat the above assembly with the final two columns, stitch and press.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 5 Trail of Tears (Printer Friendly Version)

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Six will be posted on June 11, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Image of BeeIf you visit the Trail of Tears Visitor Center soon, you may experience the carpenter bees working at the entrance. While their buzzing is loud, they aren’t aggressive at all and are too busy making holes in the soft wood to bother you. It’s kind cool and I had to get a picture of one to share, because…you know. 🙂

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Welcome the latest #usebothsides pattern: Angelina!

Month Three BOM Mystery Quilt

The third block of the River Heritage Mystery Quilt is revealed!

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Pictured is Tower Rock (Grand Tower) on the frozen Mississippi River.

This photo, taken by Jake Pohlman in January 2018,  shows people crossing the frozen river to the landmark island and rock formation usually only accessible by land during extreme drought.  Tower Rock is located in the Brazeau Township, Perry County, Missouri, near the town of Wittenberg, Missouri, and across the river from Grand Tower, Illinois. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. Jacques Marquette, a French explorer, mentioned this island in 1673 when he passed by this formation. Tower Rock has been known to instill both fear and poetry in river pilots due to the force of the whirlpool effect the water hitting the formation creates.

Month 3 – Flock of Geese

Welcome to the third month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! A flock of geese is a common sight in our area, especially in the fields adjacent to the river line. Flock of Geese is made with two easy components but, as with Railroad Crossing, it can be used to make a stunning quilt by itself or with a secondary block. As I mentioned in the introduction, I am making my quilt blocks very scrappy, so where it calls for one large dark and one large light square, I make two to achieve a scrappy look. I toss my extra squares in my BOM scrap bin to grab for future blocks.

Flock of Geese uses dark and light fabrics. It is an easy block made with two four-patches of half-square triangles (HS) and two large half-square triangles.

Printer Friendly Version

Cutting Instructions

From light fabrics:                            From dark fabrics:                Image of Flock of Geese Block                      

1 – 7-inch square                                1 – 7-inch square

4 – 4-inch squares                               4 – 4-inch squares

RST = right sides together

 

Draw a diagonal line on the reverse side of the 7-inch and 4-inch light squares. Lay the light squares on the same size dark squares, matching edges, RST. Using a quarter-inch foot, sew ¼ inch on each side from the drawn line. Cut on the line. Press each half square triangle towards the darker fabric. Square/trim each large HS to 6 ½ inches and small HS to 3 ½ inches.

Lay out the pieces according to the block picture. Make four-patches out of the small HS by turning the right-side HS onto the left-side HS, RST. Stitch across the top. Press Row 1 to the right, Row 2 to the left. Flip Row 1 onto Row 2, RST, match seams, and pin. Stitch. Press open. Square/trim to 6 ½ inches.

Flip the top four-patch onto the large HS. Stitch. Press to the HS.

Flip the bottom HS onto the four-patch. Stitch. Press to HS.

Turn the top row down onto the bottom row, RST, match seams, and pin. Stitch across the top. Press four-patches open. Trim the block to 12 1/2 inches.

You have made your Flock of Geese block! Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter! Month Four will be posted on April 9, 2018. Subscribe below to get posts automatically emailed to you!

Quilt Retreat Checklist

Image of Quilters

Read HERE about this Jonas Bluffs Retreat!

 

Quilt retreats are filled with friends, fabric, laughter, and food.

Here’s a quilt retreat checklist – Lady of the Lake style!

Quilt Retreat Packing List
2018 Lady of the Lake Style!

Since each quilt retreat is different (due to location, format, schedules, work stations, and even the people you go with), I’ve decided to share how we do quilt retreat at Kentucky Dam Village, Lady of the Lake style!

We have eight lovely ladies in one cabin. We each set up our work station, stitch a lot, eat a lot, share a lot, and laugh a lot. We schedule our meals and each person provides in some way, either meals or supplies.

This year will be a working retreat for me, but I’m looking forward to working in the company of some of my dearest friends! Hope you get some use from this list and a little insight to dynamics of the Lady of the Lake gals.

Sewing Machine (I take my featherweight) and supplies:

Electrical cord, foot pedal, extra light bulb, manual, bobbins, Q-tips (for cleaning machine, not ears)

General Quilting Supplies:

Seam ripper, scissors, rotary cutter and blades, rulers, cutting mat, iron, pressing surface, tables, electrical cords, extension cords, extra lighting, fabric spray, pins, hand-work supplies, guild directory, ¼” guide and 3M removable double-stick for guide on machine.

Personal Items:
Pajamas, preferred drinks, snacks and food for meals not planned, rice bag for sore muscles, “Oh, Ross!” massager for neck and shoulders (reference Poldark), comfortable clothing, walking shoes, jeans for shopping trips, jacket/sweatshirt, overnight bag/products, Advil, pain relief lotion

My Work Station (while at retreat this year, I’ll be filling orders, designing more patterns, working on our guild’s mystery quilt pattern designing, and attaching labels to #usebothsides quilts):

Personal fireplace heater, saddle chair, templates, blank paper, pencils, computer, keyboard, mouse, and cords, printer and cords, printer paper, batteries, paper cutter, tape, mailing bags, patterns, background fabrics, focus fabrics, fusible, basting glue, applique scissors, Kathy’s quilt, Phoebee, Belle, Lily, Sally, Fiona quilts, phone charger, Fitbit charger, dvd player and exercise mat.

Food:
Ingredients for my assigned meal: Cheesy, Broccoli Potato Soup with salad and bread.
Snacks (chocolate, trail mix, licorice)
Tea and waters
This doesn’t look like much food, but when each quilter brings extra to share, we end up with lots of snacks and never has anyone lost weight on a retreat – except one gal – she was determined!

Quilt retreats are fun, productive, yummy, and tiresome all rolled into one week!

Supply List Printer Format

Click here for #usebothsides quilt patterns!

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Free Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month One for River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt is well underway!

With Month Two being revealed right here on Monday, February 12th, I thought we’d take a look at the blocks shared so far with the hashtag: #riverheritage

These blocks use dark, medium, and light fabrics of your choice.

See the Introduction HERE for more information about the quilt, including the setting.

Image of Mystery Quilt Poster

Click here for link to Introduction.

Click HERE for Month One: Paddle Wheel

Image of BOM

Click here for link to Month One.

 

Look at all the fabulous fabrics used in these Paddle Wheels!Image of Paddle Wheel BlocksImage of Paddle Wheel BlocksImage of Paddle Wheel Blocks

It’s not too late to start this free mystery quilt. Make your Paddle Wheel today!

Subscribe below to receive blog posts directly to your email or check back here on the second Monday of each month for the next block reveal!

Share your blocks with this in the post: #riverheritage

#usebothsides Pattern NEWS: Sally has a new friend!

Image of Flamingo Quilt

Fiona – Click HERE

Image of Seahorse Pattern

Sally – Click HERE

Shop all the #usebothsides patterns at www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios

It’ll Be Fun, They Said

Find out what happens when I join a quilt guild Round Robin challenge:

Let’s do a Round Robin! It’ll be fun…wait, that was ME saying that!

Now here I sit with the dreaded pizza box–which, by the way, makes me hungry for pizza every time I see it–and I have a feeling of dread.

What’s inside and why did I think this would be a good idea?

I’ve participated in a Round Robin before. You know how it goes, everyone starts with a certain size block and each block has borders added by a different quilter and at the next guild meeting the blocks with borders get passed on to the next quilter until you get a completed wall hanging quilt top made with your original block. It was lots of fun in 2008! So what’s the difference? Why am I so afraid of ruining each of my four other friend’s quilts?

Round Robin 2008 with Cindy Spaeth and Mary Lou Rutherford

Well, let’s see what’s different here? Nine years ago there were only three of us in our group. I didn’t know the other ladies too well, so maybe there was some safety in that.

I was fairly new in the guild. There it is…I was a newbie! I had no fear! I didn’t realize what could go wrong- I didn’t know all the “rules” and I certainly didn’t concern myself with design knowledge. If I liked it, I did it. That was it.  And even though I say I like to fight the establishment and throw the rules out the window, I do respect other people’s need for rules and order.

THAT’S what scares me! Can I do creative, yet disciplined work that will pass muster with these awesome quilters?

I guess that why they call it a challenge! Time will tell and you will know in about four months!

My block and fabric offerings for the Round Robin Challenge.

Stay tuned. In the meantime, I think I’ll call Dominoes.

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