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Tag: Mystery Quilt (page 1 of 2)

River Heritage – Hovering Hawks

Hovering Hawks is the eighth block in our mystery quilt, River Heritage. As you know, most of the blocks in this quilt are classics. Such is the case with this one. Image of Hovering Hawks Month

The Hovering Hawks quilt block has been around a long, long time. There’s an interesting history lesson by Barbara Brackman HERE about the block and it’s symbolic meaning with the civil war.

I think you’ll find this quilt fun to make.  You’ll arrange half-squares with single blocks, so piecing will be easy. The challenge for me was deciding where to place my fabrics.

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 8 Hovering Hawks

Welcome to the eighth month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt!

 Hovering Hawks is made from sixteen squares, ten of them made from half-square triangles. This block has been made over the years using lots of different fabric and value combinations. I played with my fabrics quite a while before making my final choices for this block.  Use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions: 

From light fabric:                                         From dark or medium fabric:                                

Five – 4-inch squares                                      Five – 4-inch squares

Four – 3 ½-inch squares                                Two – 3 ½ inch squares

 

RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the five light squares. Layer one dark/medium 4-inch square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to

 3 ½ inches. Makes ten half-square triangle sets. 

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen squares according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows to the right, even rows to the left.

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press.

Repeat with the final two columns, stitch and press.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

 

Click here for printer-friendly version: River Heritage Month 8 Hovering Hawks

Photographing actual hovering hawks proved to be quite a challenge. First, from what I’ve read, the red-tailed hawk which is likely what lives here might not even hover. They might be doing something that appears to be a hover, but, according to the experts, isn’t actually a hover. Image of Hawk

Also, I could only find single hawks hovering/not hovering. Any grouping of birds that I thought might be hawks were actually turkey buzzards. So, kinda like the glimmer of “river” in “Eagle’s Nest”, we’re gonna say this is a hawk and it is HOVERING! Have fun with this block!

Month Nine will be posted on September 10, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com

Click on the tab above for all the block posts for River Heritage.

Check out the new patterns in my #usebothsides patterns in my ETSY SHOP HERE!

River Heritage – Eagle’s Nest

Get a bird’s-eye view from Inspiration Point and Month Seven in the River Heritage BOM mystery quilt block: Eagle’s Nest.Image of Month Seven Ad

This is one of my favorite blocks!  It has a few more pieces and variety than the last two month’s blocks. This block has a nine-patch in the center which is set on-point and is surrounded by flying geese sections. Like the “inspirational” pictures accompanying this post, this block will have a high perch in the River Heritage quilt setting.

Inspiration Point, in the rolling hills of the Shawnee National Forest, provides a breathtaking panoramic view of the Mississippi River valley. It is located about 30 miles from Cape Girardeau, MO, near Wolf Lake, Illinois.

Image of Rock Cliffs

Approaching Inspiration Point

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Love the reflection of the tree below.

The hike to the viewing rocks is short and pleasant from the upper lot. (The lower lot looks like a pretty tough climb.) If we hadn’t seen people on the rocks, I’m not sure we would have ventured out to them, but the path isn’t as treacherous as it looked from the trail. (I don’t advise taking little ones as there are no safety rails.)Image of Adjacent RocksImage of Rocks

Image of Matt and View

My darling hubby taking me on another adventure to get pictures for River Heritage.

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Somewhere in the distance, one of those glimmers of water is the mighty Mississippi River, I am SURE of it! Since we made the trip and the climb to get these pictures for Eagle’s Nest, despite a bit of fear on my part (snakes and heights), we are going to go with it!Image of Eagle's Nest Block

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 7 Eagle’s Nest

Welcome to the seventh month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Eagle’s Nest has lots of pieces, but they are not difficult to make. If you go one section at a time, you’ll master what might appear to be the most difficult block in the quilt, first time around! Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

For center nine-patch:                                              For cornerstones:                                         

Five dark 2 5/8” squares                                             Four light 2” squares

Four light 2 5/8” squares

 

For triangle points:                                                   For flying geese border:

Two medium 5 3/8” squares, cut diagonally              Twelve light 2 x 3 ½” bars

Sixteen dark 2” squares

RST = right sides together

Nine-patch: Lay out squares according to picture. Chain-piece column 2 on column 1, RST, pressing the top row to the right, middle row to the left, bottom row to the right. Repeat by adding column 3 to column 2, RST.  Turn top row down onto middle row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open. Repeat by turning assembly onto bottom row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open.

Add points: Fold each triangle in half and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the center. Likewise, fold each side of the nine-patch and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the centers. Match a triangle center with a nine-patch center, RST, pin, and stitch. Press towards the triangle. Repeat for other three sides. Trim and square to 9 ½ inches.

Outer Border: Draw a line from corner to corner on the wrong side of each 2-inch square. Make flying geese by laying the square on the right side of a 2 x 3 ½ inch bar, with the drawn line starting in the center of the bar and going downward to the right. Stitch on the line. Press. Open the layers and trim the center layer using scissors, leaving about a ¼-inch seam. (This leaves the original rectangle and the new triangle on top.) Repeat process for the left side of the bar. Trim/square if necessary to 2 x 3 ½ inches (same as the original bar size). Make eight.

Assemble block: Lay out flying geese, bars, and corner squares around the center block according to the picture. Stitch one flying geese on each side of one bar. Press to the bar. Make four sets. Now add corner squares, one on each end of two sets. Press to the squares.

Pin sets without squares to left and right sides of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open. Pin sets with corner squares to the top and bottom of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 7 Eagle’s Nest (printer-friendly version)

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Eight will be posted on August 13, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Subscribe below to catch all the buzz! Check out my Etsy Shop: CreativeBeeStudios (click here). Bubbles pattern is now available! #usebothsidesImage of Whale Quilt

 

 

 

River Heritage – Port and Starboard

Quilts Ahoy! Month six in our river-themed mystery quilt is called Port and Starboard.Image of River Heritage Ad

I knew from Girl Scout days and canoeing that port meant left (both words have four letters) and Starboard meant right when looking out the front of your boat, vessel, canoe, ship, or even kayak, I guess. What I didn’t know was how those terms came to be.  Here’s what I found out:

When boats were controlled by a steering oar (before the rudder was centered on the boat), it was usually on the right side of the stern. Sailors would call that side the “steering side” and eventually it became a combination of two Old English words: “steor”  and “bord”, which mean “steer” and “side of the boat”. 

The opposite, or left side, of the boat was usually used for docking and loading the boat and was known as the “larboard”. Apparently, “larboard” was too easily confused with “starboard”, so the term “port” was adopted to refer to the side that faced the porters who loaded (ported) supplies onto the boat.

So there you have it: Port and Starboard.Image at Ferry Dockign

Image of Elmer Wichern

Uncle Elmer.

Now for the ferry! While brainstorming for ways to photograph the river for this fun mystery adventure, I thought of the ferry crossing in Ste. Genevieve. I have vague memories of crossing the ferry as a kid and I knew my Uncle Elmer piloted the ferry for a number of years. My cousin, Bonnie, shared with me that he and 4 other men purchased the ferry in 1975 to keep it running for farmers who lived in Ste. Genevieve and farmed in Illinois. He would pilot the boat on the weekends during his retirement.  Uncle Elmer loved the river and spent a lot of time there. If my Aunt Alice didn’t know where he was, she could find him at the river talking to fishermen and farmers. Before he married Aunt Alice, he was a river boat pilot pushing barges from St. Louis to New Orleans. Image of Young Man Working the RiverNow his grandson, Jeff, pushes barges from Tower Rock in Ste. Gen. down the river as far as New Orleans.

Elmer’s younger brother, Bill (my dad), also worked the river as a young man. The only story I remember from my dad about working on the river is that once while in New Orleans he got an anchor tattood on his arm–and a lot of trouble from his siblings when he got home! I loved that anchor tattoo.

Image of Orville Wichern

My dad.

Image of River Crossing

The Ste. Gen – MoDoc River Ferry Summer hours  (April 1 – October 31):
Monday – Saturday: 6 am – Last run at 5:30pm; Sunday : 9 am – Last run at 5:30pm
There are different rates for pedestrian, horseback, bicycles, motorcycles, and different size vehicles plus you can choose round trip or one-way. It was a lot of fun and I recommend it! Click here for more information.Image of River Image of Ferry Piloting across River

                                                  River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 6 Port and Starboard

Welcome to the sixth month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Port and Starboard is made from sixteen half-square triangles squares, like Trail of Tears, but with a different layout. Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. You can use as few as three different fabrics or as make your block as scrappy as you like. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

From light fabric:                                         From dark fabric:                                        Image of Quilt Block

Eight– 4-inch squares                                     Four – 4-inch squares

From medium fabric:

Four – 4-inch squares

RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the eight light squares. Layer one dark square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other three dark/light pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches. Makes eight sets.

 

Repeat the above method using medium/light combination to make eight sets. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches.

 

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen half-square triangles according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.Image of Black and White Port and Starboard Block

 

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows to the right, even rows to the left.

 

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press.

Repeat with the final two columns, stitch and press.

 

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 6 Port and Starboard Printer-FriendlyImage of Vehicle on Ferry

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Seven will be posted on July 9, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Tips for Half-Square Blocks

Here’s a simple but effective tip for trimming up your half-square triangle blocks. Keep in mind, there’s more than one way to…(I love my cat too much to finish that phrase)…make a half-square, but here’s how I do it for the mystery quilt:

In this example, we are wanting 3 1/2″ finished blocks so I’m starting with 4″ squares. Draw a diagonal line, corner to corner, on the reverse side of the lightest fabric.Image of Two Fabric Squares

Put right sides together and use a 1/4″ foot ti stitch 1/4″ from either side. (If I was making a lot of these – like for last month’s block- I’d run them all through, stitching down one side (chain-piecing) and then turn them all and stitch down the other side of them all.)Image of Block with Stitching

Cut on the center line and press to the lighter fabric. The block should be larger than 3 1/2″ and have threads and tails (or ears) on them.

Here is The Tip: Using any ruler with a 45-degree line, place that line along the diagonal seam of your block and so that the over-all size after you trim the first two sides is still slightly larger than 3 1/2″. Notice the extra fabric outside of the 3 1/2″ marks? Trim the first two sides.Image of Block and Ruler

Spin your block and now line up the trimmed sides directly on the 3 1/2″ marks. Trim the last two sides.Image of Last Cut for Block

Maybe you figured this out on your own, but I needed a kind teacher to show me why I shouldn’t just trim that block to 3 1/2″ with the first cuts. I AM from the Show-Me State!

If you are making the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt, you are probably figuring out that there are a lot of half-square triangle blocks  in the design. Here is a pic of last month’s Trail of Tears block. Be ready to make some more half-square triangle blocks when the reveal for Month 6 comes out next week!

Having quilted for some time, I take for granted the piecing techniques I learned in classes. I hope sharing some of these techniques helps our newer quilters.

See my Mystery Quilt page for links to all of the months and Introduction or scroll down through the blog.  Mystery Quilt posts are published on the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m.  Each month has interesting river pictures, stories, or facts about river life along with the block of that month instructions. Month 6 is revealed June 11!

Focus fabric kits available in my Etsy shop:

River Heritage – Trail of Tears

River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month Five – Trail of Tears

 

The Trail of Tears State Park, located on the Mississippi River, in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, is a beautiful park with four trails, three river overlooks, a lake, campsites, picnic areas, and a visitor’s center. It  also is a burial site which commemorates the tragic deaths and hardships of the forced relocation of the Cherokee.

Image of River View

View of the Mississippi River from Trail of Tears State Park.

Image of Cherokee on Trail of Tears

The visitor’s center is filled with information including audio recordings, video presentations, books, and static displays about the Trail of Tears, plus information about wildlife found in the area.

 

It is difficult to read, see, and hear about the struggle of these people at the hands of our government and, consequently, our country.  Still, it is wonderful to have the history and beauty of the state park right here in our own “backyard”.  If you haven’t been to the Trail of Tears State Park in a while, I recommend the drive, the views, and the history lesson.Image of Trail of Tears SignImage of Mississippi River

Image of Stone

Later found to have inaccuracies, this covered stone still stands to honor all those who endured the march of relocation on the Trail of Tears.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image of Quilt BlockThe Trail of Tears quilt block is made from sixteen half-square triangle squares (eight made from a dark/light combination and eight made from a medium/light combination).

Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.  I look forward to seeing the variety of blocks you make!

Cutting Instructions:

From two light fabrics:                                             From dark fabric:                                        

Four – 4-inch squares, totaling 8                        Four – 4-inch squares

 

From medium fabric:

Four – 4-inch squares

                                                                                               RST = right sides together

Half-square triangles:  Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each of the eight light squares. Layer one dark square and one light square, RST.  Likewise, layer the other three dark/light pairs, RST. Stitch ¼ inch from the diagonal line for each set (chain-piecing method). Remove and clip the threads connecting the sets. Stitch ¼ inch seam on the other side of the drawn line. Clip apart. Cut on the drawn line. Press. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches. Makes eight sets. 

Repeat the above method using medium/light combination to make eight sets. Trim/square each set to 3 ½ inches.

Assemble block:  Position the sixteen half-square triangles according to the picture. Take a black/white photo to double-check your layout using value.

Turn each piece from Column 2 onto Column 1, RST. Chain-piece a ¼ inch seam on the right edge. Clip apart and press odd rows (1 & 3) to the right, even rows (2 & 4) to the left.

Repeat with the next section by turning Column 4 onto Column 3, RST, stitch and press. Now you have two columns.

Repeat the above assembly with the final two columns, stitch and press.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 1 and 2, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Nestle seams and pin Rows 3 and 4, RST, and stitch. Press open.

Repeat with final two sections, stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 5 Trail of Tears (Printer Friendly Version)

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Six will be posted on June 11, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Image of BeeIf you visit the Trail of Tears Visitor Center soon, you may experience the carpenter bees working at the entrance. While their buzzing is loud, they aren’t aggressive at all and are too busy making holes in the soft wood to bother you. It’s kind cool and I had to get a picture of one to share, because…you know. 🙂

Subscribe for posts to come to your email. Please share the mystery with friends – it’s not too late to start!

Welcome the latest #usebothsides pattern: Angelina!

Month Four – Lighted Bridge

River Heritage Mystery Quilt continues with Month Four!Image of Month Four Promo

Lighted Bridge

The Bill Emerson cable stay bridge stands over the Mississippi River between Cape Girardeau, Missouri and East Cape Girardeau, Illinois. Opened in 2003, the bridge is a beautiful landmark which thousands of people cross each day. Lighted at night, it is a beautiful  and iconic structure,  especially in the month of October when all the lights are pink for the Pink Up Cape breast cancer awareness campaign. The bridge is 4,000 feet long, 100 feet wide and is illuminated with 140 lights.

 

Lighted Bridge is made of four large flying geese (depicting the lighted cables and their reflection in the river) and three strips (sky, bridge roadway, and water). Image of Quilt BlockFollow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your bridge block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices. I look forward to seeing the variety of bridges we make!

Lighted Bridge uses light fabric for the two bridge cables, medium for the lighted night sky and reflected cables, and dark for the bridge roadway and water.

Cutting Instructions:
From light fabrics:                                                                                                                       From dark fabrics:
Two – 3 ½ x 6 ½ inch rectangles                                                                                                         One – 1 x 12 ½ inch strip for bridge roadway
From medium fabrics:                                                                                                                             Four – 3 ½ inch squares for water
Two – 3 ½ x 6 ½ inch rectangles                                                                                                        One – 3 x 12 ½ inch strip for water
for reflected cables
One – 3 ½ x 12 ½ inch strip for sky
Four – 3 ½ inch squares for sky                                                                                            RST = right sides together

Flying Geese: Draw a diagonal line on the reverse side of the four medium and four dark squares. Position a medium square RST on the corner of a light rectangle. Stitch on the line. Press. Peel back the top triangle of the square you just pressed and trim the middle layer to ¼ inch from the seam to reduce bulk. Repeat this process at the opposite corner of the rectangle. Flying Geese should be 3 ½ x 6 ½ inches. Trim if necessary. Repeat with second light rectangle. Makes two light flying geese.

Align one light flying geese RST on another, making sure they are facing the same direction. Stitch on the right side. Press seam open.

Position a dark square RST on the corner of a medium rectangle. Repeat instructions for Flying Geese above. Repeat with second medium rectangle. Makes two medium flying geese.

Align one medium flying geese RST on another, making sure they are facing the same direction. Stitch on the right side. Press seam open.

Block Assembly:
Refer to the picture to lay pieces in order from top to bottom.
Place medium strip RST on light flying geese. Stitch; press to strip.
Place dark 1-inch strip RST on light flying geese. Stitch; press to strip.
Place dark 3-inch strip RST on bottom of medium flying geese. Stitch; press to strip.
Place medium flying geese on 1-inch strip RST. Stitch; press to strip.
Trim and square block to 12 ½ inches.

Image of Lighted Bridge

View from Red Star Boat Ramp

Printer Friendly Version

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Five will be posted on May14, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

 

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Chain-piecing a Quilt Block

When piecing a sampler quilt (like the current River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt), chain piecing individual blocks can save you time and help you stay organized.

Since we have all levels of quilters participating in the mystery, I want to share a technique which would help our newer quilters down the road. Chain-piecing.  It’s something I take for granted now, but I remember the lightbulb going on when I was first taught to chain-piece. Here’s how I approach chain-piecing an individual block (which might just show up down the road (river?) in your mystery quilt).

Have you ever given road directions to someone and said, “It’s not nearly as confusing as it sounds.”? That’s how describing chain-piecing is. Hand’s on, it’s easy to grasp. In words, it seems confusing. Take it a step at a time the first few times and soon you’ll be chain-piecing without even thinking about it.

*Cut and prepare your block pieces. In the example I use here, the block is made from all half-square triangles (HST).

 

*Arrange your block pieces according to the block design. (I like to use my ironing board surface.) If it’s a complicated design, I like to check myself by taking a black and white picture (to see value) to make sure I’ve arranged the pieces correctly.

Image of Quilt Block

This quilt block is made of four rows and four columns.

 

*Notice that there are four rows (left to right) and four columns (top to bottom). Turn each HST in Column 2 over onto the HST to the left, in Column 1, right sides together (RST) as shown.

Image of Chain Piecing a Quilt Block

Turn Column 2 onto Column 1, RST.

Likewise, turn each HST from Column 4 over onto the HST to the left, in Column 3, RST.

 

Layer the sets in order, starting with Row 4 on the bottom, offsetting them to keep them distinctly separate as shown below.

Image of Layered Block Sets

Layer the sets from the bottom up to take to your machine.

Carry them to the machine, keeping them in order.

 

Starting with the top set, stitch along the right edge. 

As you get close to the end of stitching the first set, have the next set ready to slide under the presser foot. (I love using my knee bar for this step.) Stop stitching for a moment before you come off the edge of the first set. Slide the second set just under the foot so that it catches the feed dogs, but isn’t touching the first set and continue stitching. It is okay to have two or three “air” stitches between sets. Repeat this for all the sets.

 

Trim the threads between all the sets, keeping them in order. (Your first set is from Columns 1 & 2 in Row 1 and your last set is from Columns 3 & 4, Row 4.)

Press according to block instructions and arrange them in again, only now you have two columns.

Image of Chain Piecing Technique

Now you have two columns.

Turn Column 2 onto Column 1, RST, for all four rows. Again, layer the four rows with Row 4 on the bottom and Row 1 on the top. Take to the machine and chain piece along the right edges.

Image of Chain Piecing Technique

Turn Column 2 onto Column 1 and stitch.

Clip threads, press, and arrange the rows in order. With the columns complete, you only have four rows left to piece.

Image of Block Rows

Rows 1 is at the top and Row 4 is at the bottom.

Continue by piecing the rows together, turning Row 1 down onto Row 2, RST. Nestle and pins the seams. Repeat for Row 3 and Row 4. Stitch along the top edges.

Trim and press. Now lay the two remaining rows in order. Turn Row 1 down onto Row 2. Nestle and pins the seams. Stitch along the top edge. Trim and press.

Remember to square and trim your block according to instructions.

If you are a new quilter, what techniques are you wanting to learn? If you are an experienced quilter, what are your favorites to share?

Month Four in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt will be revealed on Monday, April 9 at 9 a.m.!Image of Three Quilt Blocks

 

 

Heading to AQS Quilt Week in Paducah? How about stopping in Hancock’s of Paducah? You’ll see TEN #usebothsides hanging there with patterns during the show!

Image of Three Quilts

Phoebee, Belle, and Lily

Image of Three Quilts

Rose, Emily, and Kate

Image of Cauldron Wall Hanging

Something’s Brewing

Image of Seahorse Quilt

Sally Quilt Pattern

Image of Flamingo Quilt

Fiona Quilt Pattern

Image of Poinsettia Quilt

Pepita Quilt Pattern

Yakity Yak – Let’s Talk Backs

Sometimes…er, many times…okaay, MOST of the time the back of my quilt is an afterthought. All of my excitement and energy is focused on the quilt top and when the top is finished, I want to quilt it NOW.Image of Quilt Back

I’ll have fleeting thoughts while stitching the top about what fabric I want on the back, but I’m not the type of quilter who generally purchases my backing ahead of time, unless I’ve purchased a kit.

Being a long-arm quilter, I do keep in mind the color of thread I’ll be quilting my top with because that’s the color I will have in my bobbin.  Beyond that, and especially in the last year, since I’ve knocked out 14 quilt patterns in nine months, time is the biggest factor I considered when choosing a backing.

Maybe that seems haphazard and disorganized, but, on the up-side, I have to say my backings have gotten more interesting in the last year!

Take Something’s Brewing, for example. Definitely time was a factor because it was a seasonal quilt I was designing in the fall. So as to not completely miss out on the current season, I had to get her done! Here’s what I did to use what I had on hand: Instant Bargello.Image of Cauldron Quilt

One of my favorite quilting books is called Instant Bargello by Susan Kisro.Image of Book I grabbed some scraps and did three little columns of that technique which gave me enough width for the backing. It was fun and fast!

Notice the Prairie Point Hanging Method (click here for more information)?

Those prairies points proved a bit sentimental for me because one of the fabrics was a Debbie Mumm which belonged to my mother-in-law, Pat. I have little bits of her fabrics in a lot of my #usebothsides quilts.

Something’s Brewing with the label, too. It just couldn’t be a square label. A shout-out to my friend, Mary, for encouraging me to put a little character into my labels! Notice it’s using the reverse side? (wink)

Do you have interesting back ideas? Please share in the comments section!

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In case you missed it, here is the link for the latest BOM block:Image of Tower Rock on Mississippi River

 

 

Simple Designs for Stunning Quilts

Grace features a soft blue mason jar with a lovely spray of pink flowers.Image of Grace Pattern Cover

 

She’s petite. Just 18 x 24 inches.

The Grace quilt pattern is a great way to try out the #usebothsides pattern. As with all the patterns,  you learn how to audition your focus and background fabrics to make a delightful, cheery wall hanging. With a focus fabric kit (you still provide the background fabrics), you know you’ll have the perfect mason jar and floral spray.

Shop all the #usebothsides patterns and kits HERE.

Next Colorful Petals Class:

Image of Three Quilts

Colorful Petals Quilt Patterns

Saturday, March 17th

10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

at The Golden Needle in Cape Girardeau, MO

Join the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt fun! Click the pictures here for links to the Introduction and Months One and Two:

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Visit www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios.com

Free Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month One for River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt is well underway!

With Month Two being revealed right here on Monday, February 12th, I thought we’d take a look at the blocks shared so far with the hashtag: #riverheritage

These blocks use dark, medium, and light fabrics of your choice.

See the Introduction HERE for more information about the quilt, including the setting.

Image of Mystery Quilt Poster

Click here for link to Introduction.

Click HERE for Month One: Paddle Wheel

Image of BOM

Click here for link to Month One.

 

Look at all the fabulous fabrics used in these Paddle Wheels!Image of Paddle Wheel BlocksImage of Paddle Wheel BlocksImage of Paddle Wheel Blocks

It’s not too late to start this free mystery quilt. Make your Paddle Wheel today!

Subscribe below to receive blog posts directly to your email or check back here on the second Monday of each month for the next block reveal!

Share your blocks with this in the post: #riverheritage

#usebothsides Pattern NEWS: Sally has a new friend!

Image of Flamingo Quilt

Fiona – Click HERE

Image of Seahorse Pattern

Sally – Click HERE

Shop all the #usebothsides patterns at www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios

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