Creative Bee Studios

Sweet Ideas for Creative Minds - #usebothsides

Walking in a Winter Wonderland

Sleigh bells ring – are you listening?

In the lane, snow is glistening…

Want to experience some old style Christmas? There are a couple of ways here locally (Southeast Missouri) and in towns all across the nation – and if you can’t find one near you, grab a Christmas themed book – the one I’m sharing includes quilts, a Christmas Walk, and antiques in a quaint wine country town.

Celebrated author and creator of the popular Colebridge Community and East Perry County novel series,  Ann Hazelwood provides insight into a new community with her Wine Country Quilts series. I am currently reading Lily Girl’s Christmas Quilts (2nd book of the new series) and was fascinated to learn that the real town, Augusta, Missouri (upon which the series is based), is having a Christmas Walk (as depicted in the book), and the author, Ann Hazelwood, will be signing books at this Stone Ledge Antiques shop (I wonder if it looks like Lily’s) starting at 7 tomorrow night! Learn more about Ann’s books HERE. Take a stroll on the Candlelight Christmas Walk tomorrow night – find more information HERE

Image of LIly Girl's Christmas Quilt Book

A beautiful sight- we’re happy tonight.

Stone Ledge Antiques during the Candlelight Christmas Walk in Augusta, MO.

Another opportunity  for an old-style Christmas experience is to take the driving tour of country churches in rural Southeast Missouri counties of Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, and Perry. You are encouraged to tag your steeple-chasing buddies for this self-guided tour and travel the beautiful country-side to these decorated country churches where you’ll find music, warmth, treats, and the real meaning of Christmas. This tour begins today at 2 p.m. The tours run both today and tomorrow until 9 p.m. Learn more HERE.

I hope you’ll find joy and take a break from rush of the season by going walking in a winter wonderland.

Need a last minute gift for the quilter in your life?Shop #usebothsides quilt patterns HERE.

Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a Son, and shall call His name Immanuel. Isaiah 7:14.

Cross-over Quilting Tools

Like many of us quilters, space is at a premium, so when I find a tool or machine that has multiple uses, I get excited about it!

Let’s face it, we can’t make everyone a quilt every time we need a gift! That’s why I like to use my Brother Scan N Cut, which I mostly bought for quilting purposes, to also make unique non-quilted  gifts.

Click HERE for a review of  the monogrammed baby quilt I made using a phone app and the Scan N Cut:

Click HERE to see the old Italian proverb made with Scan N Cut in this Italian Row-by-Row quilt.

The Scan N Cut project I’d like to share with you today is one I made for Christmas last year – and it requires a short story…

Each year, we gather at my husband’s family farm before Christmas. We all traipse into the fields and watch as the chosen tree is cut down. The (now grown) grand-kids decorate the tree while the older grown-ups visit. Before opening gifts and eating, everyone gathers around the very long dining table while our mother-in-law leads us on the piano in Christmas carols. It’s sounds all cozy and Hallmark-y, right?

Then comes the finale, “The Twelve Days of Christmas”! Except for two assigned parts, we all do the motions for each of the days. The assigned parts? The three brothers are “Lords a Leapin'” for which they do what is supposed to be a leaping type of movement (they take this role very seriously) and any new boyfriend or girlfriend brought to the party is the “goose” for “Geese a Layin'”. This involves squatting, twisting, and flapping movements.

Image of Kiefner Brothers Leaping

Fabulous Photo by Black Kiefner

Now, there is a year-long push for new geese–so each single grandchild has a bit of pressure to find a goose to bring for Christmas! Both of our daughters will say their geese have been somewhat traumatized by Kiefner Christmas!

What does this have to do with Scan N Cut? I came up with this gift idea last year using vinyl and paint on glass in a barn wood frame. The painting was very easy, just dabbing layers of green and white in the general shape of a tree (the only tricky part was that the paint is on the back of the glass so you want to paint the foreground first). Placing the letters was easy once I figured out to use a rotary mat under my glass to line everything up.  I ended up making a few variations for other families and I think they were all well-received. Image of Hanging Picture

If you’ve wondered about using a Scan N Cut for quilting, this would be a great time of year to check them out – dealers are having sales and you need something to put on your wish list, right? (I have no affiliation with Brother or any dealers, I just like to share with you the things I like!)

Check out these Christmas items in my Etsy Shop (Click Here).Image of Poinsettia Quilt

Image of JOY QuiltImage of Blue Christmas Tree Quilt

Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a Son, and shall call His name Immanuel. Isaiah 7:14

Christmas and Quilts and JOY!

It’s the most wonderful time of the year!

“Holiday Revue” is our youngest daughter’s current dinner theatre gig at the Myers Dinner Theatre in Hillsboro, Indiana.

Our first stop in the quaint town was a visit to the old-fashioned soda shop!Image of Hot Fudge Sundae

Image of Myers Dinner Theatre Logo

Everything about the dinner was delicious and the Christmas “variety” show featured every Christmas genre: we heard beautiful spiritual music, classic carols, and youthful tunes. Featured guests included Mary and Joseph, Elvis, Santa and Mrs. Claus, Frosty, a cow girl, a giant blue bear, Linus, and a stage full of life-size toys. Image of Raggedy AnnImage of Cow Girl

And there was lots of audience participation! Yes, that is my husband on stage and dancing to Santa Baby! I got a little hug from Elvis!Image of Matt DancingImage of Karla and Elvis

The show ended my favorite way- with a wonderful White Christmas finale!

Image of Matt on StageImage of JacquelynImage of Singers

Oh, the weather outside is frightful…

It’s the most wonderful time for quilts! Do you include quilts in your Christmas decor?

You might recall JOY, made with Hoffman California Fabrics All Aglow on a scrappy background. The tree, topper, and binding are made from the front of the focus fabric and the gifts are made from the reverse.Image of JOY Quilt

This year, I #usebothsides of one Hoffman California Fabrics Supernova Seasons panel for the tree, topper, gifts, and  binding! It’s a fun quilt pattern that makes a great gift for a quilter friend, a quick quilt to gift, or to add to your Christmas decor.Image of Blue Christmas Tree QuiltImage of JOY Quilt Hanging

Shop HERE for the JOY Quilt Pattern.

Also, learn about Pepita (named after the poor Mexican girl in the Legend of the Poinsettia who had no gift to give the Christ Child on Christmas Eve) HERE.Image of Poinsettia Quilt

Silver bells…silver bells…

Yes, I’ve been listening to Hallmark Christmas music the whole way to and from Hillsboro, Indiana!

I love the classic big band sounds of the holidays and Hallmark has a great variety. Sirius XM has Free Listen – so check out the Christmas channels!

And there shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots: Isaiah 11:1

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Exploring Quilty Box

I’ve been intrigued by Quilty Box (click here) for some time now.

The combination of

a) them featuring Tula Pink and

b) me learning about the first-time discount was what it took for me to finally subscribe. I want to share my discovery with YOU!Image of Box

I remember as a teenager subscribing to a make-up club. It was so fun to get different products in the mail to try each month. I figured, what could be better than make-up? Fabric, patterns, notions, thread, and more, all mailed in a cute little teal and brown box and delivered to my mailbox!

Options: They state there is a Quilty Box for everyone – and there is!

Classic:  This is the original box which features a different artist each month, 2 yards of fabric, a spool of thread, pattern,  one or two notions or tools, and a mini-magazine. The price is $48.00 but if you prepay, you can get discounts on that monthly rate.

English Paper Piecing: In partnership with PaperPieces.com, this box includes a pack of 5 x 5″ fabrics, thread, templates and paper pieces for the pattern, and a mini magazine. This starting price is $34.99 with discounts applied for prepayment.

Mini: Inside this little package you’ll find a full-sized pack of 5 x 5″ fabric and a small spool of thread, the mini-magazine, three patterns, a mini-pattern, and an English paper-piecing pattern all for $23.99 (with discounts for prepayment).

First-time discount? Receive $10 off your first box!

So what are my thoughts about Quilty Box?

I loved it! It was so fun to get in the mail. I saved my box to open until I could give it my full attention! My box came with eight fat-quarters of Tula’s new line. This was especially fun because when we heard her speak this fall in Paducah, she explained how she designed that line of fabric. Also inside my box was Aurifil thread, a cute pattern for zippered pouches which I would actually love to make, zippers for the bags, and large piece of Soft and Stable for the bags. The Bundles of Inspiration magazine is high-quality and  I’m looking forward to reading it cover-to-cover. It features an article about Tula, several patterns, history and how-to’s for English paper piecing, and more!Image of Box Contents

Need a gift for a quilter friend? Send them a Quilty Box!

Shipping is free in the USA.

One thing you need to know about Quilty Box is that your order begins an automatic subscription. You can easily and promptly cancel your subscription with a simple email to hello@quiltybox.com . I did it and received an email confirmation of the cancellation immediately.

So why did I cancel my subscription? ONLY, ONLY, ONLY because I am already overwhelmed with projects, new patterns designs, my Etsy shop, and my teaching/program schedule! If I were wanting a fun way to treat myself, get inspiration, and learn about the latest in the industry, I’d definitely continue my subscription!

By the way, I hereby reserve the right to order Quilty Box again!

 In fact…maybe (on behalf of my readers), I should really order at least one of each TYPE of Quilty Box – so I can report back, of course. What do you think?

Here is my Tula Pink version of Aria (expressive music heard in opera – she’s a “singer”…) Quilt Patttern. See Vintage Machine Quilt Pattern for more information.Image of Pink Sewing Machine

Shop Aria and 22 more #usebothsides patterns  in my  Creative Bee Studios Etsy shop.

 

Phoebee Goes to Market!

I’ve wondered for a few years what it would be like to collaborate with a fabric company. I never dreamed it would be this fun!

On August 3, at 3:47 p.m., I opened two packages of 21 fabrics  from Hoffman California Fabrics company. Image of Fabric

For the next six hours, I auditioned 42 fabrics (both sides of each) trying to get just the right mix of color, contrast, values, and feel that would be worthy of this new line by Hoffman California Fabrics.

Phoebee is the pattern and Electric Garden is the fabric line. Of course, I took tons of pictures,  mostly black and white, and still this was a challenge…and a gamble! Not seeing the reverse of a fabric before-hand made me a little nervous – some fabrics just don’t have usable reverse sides. Image of Black and White Quilt Photo

Well, Electric Garden rocks! Vibrant color with a soft, contrasting reverse side was just the recipe I needed. I flipped several backgrounds to their reverse as well, so they wouldn’t compete with the bee or flowers. The next step was cutting out Phoebee and her flowers.Image of Quilt in Frame

I slept on this mix so I could get a fresh look the next morning. Yes! I began fusing and quilting (on my Handiquilter Avante) right away. Next came the prairie point hanging method, binding, label, photos, writing and producing the pattern, and Phoebee was flying to California on Tuesday, August 7th!Image of Quilt on ClotheslineImage of Phoebee QuiltImage of Quilt Pattern

Image of Back of Quilt My new friend in California let me know Phoebee arrived safely! Now for the waiting game…

Quilt Market in Houston was November 3 – 5. I was fortunate that several kind quilter souls saw Phoebee hanging in the Hoffman California Fabric booth and shared their pics with me on Instagram! Thank you, friends! Image of Phoebee at Quilt MarketImage of Electric Garden

This morning I am shipping Phoebee 2.0 patterns to a very fun quilt shop in (wait for it) Canada!

Original Phoebee and Phoebee 2.0 quilt patterns are available in my Etsy Shop HERE.

Image of Bee Quilt

Phoebee Quilt Pattern

Wholesale application HERE.

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Enjoy your quilting journey!

Vintage Machine Quilt Pattern

Aria ahr-ee-uh: expressive music often heard in opera.  (Get it?  She’s a singer?)Image of Sewing Machine Quilt

This is a fun little quilt that you can make using both sides of one focus fabric – think florals, feathers (she’s a featherweight!), sewing notions, Tula PinkKaffe Fassett Collective – the possibilities are endless for making this the cutest little machine you own!

The sewing machine and binding are made from the front of the focus fabric. The pennants, little scissors, and thimble are made using the reverse side of the same focus fabric!

Someday I’d like to own a beautiful turquoise featherweight, preferably purchased in person from Roxanne’s A Wish and A Dream shop in California! (Talk about California dreamin’ – we did live there – twice, and in three places- Dana Point, Lake Forest, and Escondido!)

I was drawn to this lovely, sweet floral with beautiful roses for this machine. Of course, the reverse side passed my audition test (pattern comes with guide for auditioning both sides of focus and background fabrics).Image of Quilt Hanging Outsides

Choosing backgrounds for this little wall hanging is the most fun. You can really mix it up here!

Each #usebothsides pattern comes with complete instructions and full-size paper templates.

Wanna jazz things up? Check out this Tula Pink version! LOVE.Image of Pink Sewing Machine Quilt

Find the Aria quilt pattern and 22 others which #usebothsides of one focus fabric in my Etsy shop: HERE.

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New-Prairie Points for Hanging Quilts

Fold a few squares, make a few stitches…here are some tips to make the Prairie Point Hanging Method your favorite way to hang small quilts!

For sizes and to review the complete method, see Hang Quilts Using Prairie Points  and Prairie Point Hanging Method

Image of quilt with words: Press. Pin. Stitch.

*Cut the right size and number of squares for your quilt size and hanging rod. (Even numbers are best so you can hang your quilts from a single point.)

*Press well.

*Stitch the raw edges prior to attaching them to your quilt using a regular stitch. (Basting seems to scoot my top layer forward.)

*Press again.

*Quickly trim uneven edges using a sharp scissor or rotary/ruler.

*Pin well.

*Use a strong doubled thread for stitching points to quilt.

*NEW: When using Prairie Points as a hanging method for unusually large rods (such as used in a show), add some looseness into your points as follows: When your binding is turned and you are ready to stitch the points down, do this for each point – fold the point across the top of the quilt at the binding. Lay a ruler on top of the prairie point, at the top edge of the quilt. Fold the point back down over the ruler. Pin or hold the point in place and stitch. This will give some added room for a large rod to be run through the points without causing tugging or distortion on the quilt.

I like to use up scraps for my prairie points. Try using the reverse side to tone them down or provide interest on the back of your quilt! #usebothsides

Image of Back of Quilt

See the front of this quilt and new pattern in the next post!

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Jacq O’Lantern Quilt Makes a Happy Boo!

Jacq O’Lantern has a happy little ghoul popping right out her top like a jack-in-the-box! The first mini #usebothsides quilt pattern, Jacq O’Lantern is too much fun to make!

She’s a pint-size lesson about value but when you make her, you’ve learned the easy tricks for using value to make any of the patterns using both sides of one focus fabric! Image of Quilt on Hanger

I was never real big on halloween decorations. I preferred to use that money to buy more Christmas lights and decorations. We didn’t avoid Halloween with our kids, but we also didn’t make a big fuss about it. So…why is it I LOVE Halloween fabric so much?

As a kid I only had a couple of drawings I liked to do – over and over. One was a beach scene with a palm tree (are you surprised?). The other was a witch on a broomstick.–she always had a long chin that jutted out and a big ole wart on her nose. Maybe these Halloween fabrics take me back to my childhood or something. Several of my favorite quilts and projects are Halloween themed. I’m sure you seen them before but, well, ’tis the season!

Image of Punch Needle

Black Kitty Punch Needle

Image of Instant Bargello Quilt

Instant Bargello Quilt

Image of Halloween Quilt

If you like Halloween fabrics like I do, chances are you have everything you need in your stash to make this little gal. So grab your stash – and turn it over! #usebothsides

Our youngest daughter’s name is Jacquelyn. We’ve always had nicknames for her such as

Jacq

Jacq Jacq

Da Jacqinator  (at the age of two she could “destroy” a room in minutes)

Jacqqity Jacq (don’t talk back)

and, among others,

Jacq O’Lantern.

Jacq O’Lantern Quilt Pattern makes a mini (a mere 12″ square) to hang perfectly on wire hanger.

See Jacq O’Lantern and all her friends HERE in my Etsy shop, Creative Bee Studios! 

 

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Quilt Author Meets Hallmark Christmas Movies

I just love it when two of my favorite things come together! Best-selling quilt author Marie Bostwick’s book, The Second Sister, is being filmed now as a Hallmark Hall of Fame movie! Image of The Second Sister Book

The movie is titled, “Christmas Everlasting” and premieres November 24th at 7 p.m. central.

While I enjoy a number of  quilt-themed (and not) books and series, I’ve often referred to Marie as “My Favorite Author” – mostly because her witty comments and clever nicknames for her family members are endearing and inspiring. (I’ve often thought we could be best friends if we were neighbors, but in reality, I’m one of many fans who exchanges about two minutes of conversation with her once a year (if I’m lucky) at book signings.)Image of Signed Book

Of course, I love her books, even those not completely engrossed in the quilting themes and I read each one more than once! I suspect Christmas Everlasting will be another staple during the holiday season!

Click here to read here about her “on set” experience!  Image of Patti LaBelle and Marie Bostwick

How cool is it that she made quilted gifts for the actors? See more pics and posts on Marie’s Facebook page! (Yes, that is Patti LaBelle!)

Image of Marie and Actors with QuiltImage of Marie Bostwick and Tatyana AliHere’s a list of some of my faves by Marie Bostwick:

Standalone Books:

The Second Sister

The Promise Girls

            Just in Time

Cobbled Court Quilt Series:

A Single Thread

A Thread of Truth

A Thread So Thin

Threading the Needle

Ties That Bind

Apart at the Seams

Too Much, Texas Series:

Between Heaven and Texas

From Here to Home

Marie has also written three historical novels and three novellas in Fern Michaels Christmas Anthologies.

Mark your calendars and hit “record”!

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Shop patterns HERE!

 

 

River Heritage Mystery Quilt Reveal

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Image of Mississippi River Sunset

The sunset over the Mississippi River is your final clue that the mystery has ended.

Photo by Anastasia Gonzales.

The mystery is revealed! Take all of those wonderful blocks and set them in this really fun, fast design. I am happy to tell you that River Heritage goes together quickly and easily! Image of River Heritage

Click here for printer-friendly version: River Heritage Setting Instructions

Setting Instructions 

The biggest challenge is to make sure all the setting flying geese point away from the center block. This is easy to achieve by laying out all your sections on a flat surface or design wall.

Finished Size: 66 x 66 inches                                     WOF = width of fabric

RST = right sides together                                          I list the colors in my quilt for reference.

Cutting:

Fabric A (soft-white) setting:

Cut six 6 ½” x WOF to cut

*Sixteen 6 ½” squares

*Eight 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangles

 

Fabric B (watery aqua) setting:

For binding, cut eight 2 ¼” WOF strips

Cut four 6 ½ x WOF to cut

*Eight 6 ½” squares

*Eight 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangles

 

Fabric C (teal batik) setting squares:

Cut four 6 ½” squares

 

Fabric D (coral) outer setting:

Cut

*Four 6 ½ x 18 ½” rectangles

*Four 6 ½ x 24 ½” rectangles

*Four 1 x 12 ½” strips

 

Fabric E (aqua) outer border*:

Cut six 3 ½” x WOF to make:

*Two 3 ½ x 60 ½” strips

*Two 3 ½ x 66 ½” strips

Setting Assembly

  1. Large Flying Geese: Draw a diagonal line on wrong side of 16 Fabric A squares. Place a marked square on LEFT side of a Fabric B 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangle, RST. Stitch on the diagonal line. Press the corner triangle open. Trim excess fabric to ¼” seam. Repeat for the right corner of each rectangle. Make 8.
  2. Setting pieces: Draw a diagonal line on wrong side of 8 Fabric B squares. Place a square on the RIGHT side of a Fabric A 6 ½ x 12 ½” rectangle RST. Stitch on the diagonal line. Press the corner triangle open and trim excess fabric to 1/4” seam. Make 4.

 

Place a marked Fabric B square on the LEFT side of Fabric A 6 ½” x 12 ½” rectangle RST. Stitch on the diagonal line. Press the corner triangle open and trim excess fabric to ¼” seam. Make 4.

Section Assembly

I suggest laying out all the pieces of your quilt on a design wall or a flat surface to make sure you keep all the points in the correct direction. Notice that the Paddle Wheel block is in the very center and that each flying geese unit points away from that center block. I will also refer to the blocks as Center, North, South, East, West, Northwest, Northeast, Southwest, and Southeast for those who want to use different placement of their individual blocks.

 

Add a flying geese to opposite sides of each of the blocks, Eagle’s Nest (North), Railroad Crossing (South), Port and Starboard (West), and Lighted Bridge (East) as shown below. Note the direction of each block and the flying geese units. Press seams towards the blocks.

 

 

Image of Eagle's Nest Block

Eagle’s Nest/North

Image of Rail Road Crossing Block

Railroad Crossing/South

Image of Port and Starboard/West

Port and Starboard/West

 

 

 

Image of Lighted Bridge Block

Lighted Bridge/East

When you lay these units in their places above, below, and to the left and right of Paddle Wheel (Center), they should form a cross shape. Do not stitch the units together yet.

Next you will make the four corner sections, using the Flock of Geese (Northwest), Hovering Hawks (Northeast), Tree Line (Southeast), and Trail of Tears (Southwest) blocks. Check that your setting units are positioned so that the colored corners are pointing inward, towards the Paddlewheel (Center) block and so that they form an “on-point” square “floating” beneath the blocks.

Sew one setting unit to the top (Flock of Geese/Northwest and Hovering Hawks/Northeast) or bottom (Trail of Tears/Southwest and Tree Line/Southeast) of the block. Press to the setting unit. Sew a setting square (Fabric C) to the light end of the other setting unit. Press to the setting unit. Match seams, RST, and sew the two units together. Add the short outer setting bar (coral) to the side and press to the bar. Finish the corner section by stitching the long outer setting bar to the top (or bottom) of the section.

Repeat for each corner unit. Refer to the diagrams below.

Image of Flock of Geese block

Flock of Geese/Northwest

Image of Hovering Hawks block

Hovering Hawks/Northeast         

 

 

Image of Trail of Tears block

Trail of Tears/Southwest

Image of Tree Line Block

Tree Line/Southeast

 

Lay out all sections. I suggest taking a black and white picture at this point to be certain all the flying geese units are pointing away from the center Paddle Wheel block and the setting units point inward.

 

 

Making Three Rows:

Top Row – Turn the Eagle’s Nest (North) section, RST, onto the corner section, Flock of Geese (Northwest), and stitch. Press to the corner section. Add the Hovering Hawks (Northeast) corner section. Press to the corner section.

Middle Row – Turn Paddle Wheel (Center), RST, onto the Port and Starboard (West) section and stitch. Press toward Paddle Wheel (Center). Likewise, add the Light Bridge (East) section and press toward Paddle Wheel (Center).

Bottom Row – Place Railroad Crossing (South), RST, on Trail of Tears (Southwest) corner section. Stitch and press towards Trail of Tears (Southwest) section. Likewise, stitch Tree Line (Southeast) to Railroad Crossing (South) and press to Tree Line (Southeast) section.

Stitch rows together, nestling seams, and press seams open.

Outer borders: While it’s important that I give you measurements for your borders, I do suggest that you measure your quilt length through the center (and after those borders are on, do likewise with the width) to determine an exact measurement. Then cut your borders to that length. Mark the center of your border with a pin and do likewise with the edge of your quilt. Pin the border to the edge, matching the center pins and pin the border in several places from the center to the corners of the top. This will help “square” your quilt and you (or your quilter) will be very happy later that you did this!

Sew Fabric E 3 ½” x 60 ½” strips to the left and right sides of the quilt top.

Sew Fabric E 3 ½” x 66 ½” strips to the top and bottom to complete the quilt top.

Image of Quilt

Finishing your River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt:

Layer your top, batting, and backing for quilting.

As a long-arm quilter, I suggest that backing and batting be 6 inches longer and wider than the quilt top. (I realize domestic machine quilters don’t need that much extra fabric and that each long-arm quilter may have a different requirement.) I used Warm and Natural Cotton Batting. I also like and often use Hobbs 80/20.

In quilting my River Heritage, I did custom quilting on each block to accentuate the piecing and uniqueness. I did a stylized free-hand quilting on the setting and border.Image of Back of Quilt

I used the Prairie Point Hanging Method and basted them on prior to adding my binding. I made these larger than normal to allow for the 6-inch requirement for our local quilt show. Notice the looseness in the points? That helps the extra-large pole to slide through easier and avoids pulling on the quilt. Before hand-stitching the points down, I folded the prairie point up over the stitched binding. Then I laid a skinny ruler along the top edge of the quilt binding and folded the prairie point back over the ruler. I stitched the point of the prairie point where it laid. This gave two binding widths of looseness in the prairie point. This isn’t necessary for normal hanging methods, but seemed to work well for this purpose.

Stitch on binding and turn by hand.

I hope you’ve enjoyed making River Heritage! I was pleasantly surprised to find a beautiful ribbon on my quilt this weekend at our local quilt show!Image of Quilt with Ribbon

Please share your quilt pictures on Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag: #riverheritage in your post!

Note: Most of the blocks in this quilt are classics, found in many books and other sources. Paddle Wheel, Tree Line, and Lighted Bridge are blocks I created to fit our theme and the setting. The setting is adapted from the book, Circle of Nine by Janet Houts & Jean Ann Wright. I love this book and recommend it (available on Amazon)!

This has been an adventure–coming up with a theme, choosing blocks (creating others), coming up with pictures for each month, and learning more about Electric Quilter 8, Canva, and WordPress! Thank you all for joining me on this journey. I hope you love your River Heritage!
                                                                                  Karla
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