Creative Bee Studios

Sweet Ideas for Creative Minds - #usebothsides

Tag: Etsy Shop (page 1 of 3)

Introducing…Merry!

Image of Truck Quilt

It’s beginning to look (and feel) a lot like winter!

Use BOTH sides of one red Christmas fabric on a snowy bed of winter fabrics.

This little red truck is dashing through a snowy lane.

“Merry” quilt pattern is available in my Etsy shop: HERE

Merry Red Truck Quilt

More Christmas patterns:

JOY – Use BOTH sides of ornament fabric, toy motifs, stars, snowflakes, pine motif fabrics…or many other fabrics for this joyful tree. The gifts beneath the tree are made using the reverse side.

Image of Quilt Close Up

Pepita – every year there are many, many poinsettia fabrics on the market – you likely have at least one in your stash – turn it over and see if the reverse would make a beautiful pot for your own poinsettia quilt! Super fun to arrange and goes together quickly! Pepita is named after the little girl in the The Legend of the Poinsettia.

Image of Quilt Close Up

“Holly” is made using BOTH sides of two panels OR BOTH sides of Christmas motif fabrics! This quilt was designed for Hoffman California Fabrics and is featured on the cover of their Winter Projects 2019 catalog!

Image of Wreath Quilt Closeup

Have a wonder-filled quilting journey!

Designing Quilts with Panels

To the tune of “On the Cover of the Rolling Stones”, I feel like singing! At the close of 2018, I happened onto my pattern, “Holly”, featured on the cover of a Hoffman California Fabrics’ catalog!

It began with an email asking if I (along with four or five other designers) would like to try our hand at designing with a new Christmas line of fabric. It’s my understanding that other designers use digital fabric swatches and their computers to design patterns. But since I use BOTH sides of the fabric, I need the real thing!

Click HERE to see the Winter Projects 2019 Catalog by Hoffman California Fabrics.

We had a week for the deadline – but since I needed the fabric shipped to me and then I needed to ship the finished quilt back to California, I had less than that to design and make the quilt!

Frankly, I was in a hurry! Add to the mix that it was Thanksgiving weekend, I was driving six hours on Saturday, attending our daughter’s show, driving four on Sunday, and staying in a hotel (with terribly inadequate lighting) until Tuesday AND, until I could see and audition BOTH sides of the fabric, I had no idea if my idea would work!

Working with both sides of fabric means lots of value-checking. You can’t tell from the front of fabric if the reverse will work. Some fabrics have great reverses and some just don’t. Click HERE for “The Tricky Traits of Value”.

The Christmas tree panel is gorgeous on its own – who would want to cut that apart? I certainly wouldn’t cut it to make another tree. I was also pretty certain that other designers would be designing borders around the whole panel, so mine had to be different.

I started to focus on the fat-quarter panel they sent. I had received a whole box of fabric to choose from and I knew if I wanted to use this panel, I couldn’t just use one fat-quarter of it or even half of them- I needed to use the whole panel. After auditioning many combinations, I decided I could use the panel – BOTH sides of the panel!

So…once again, it all comes down to fabric values. In classes, I have quilters audition many background fabrics and take lots of black and white pictures to see how their background fabrics “play” with their focus fabric. The smaller accents strips are allowed to be a bit “louder”, but the larger pieces need to provide interest as opposed to distraction. So take a look at this picture of the panel. Lots of dark fabric, right? Really pretty fabric…but more darks than lights.

Now look at a close-up of the quilt. Do you recognize those fabrics? …same fat quarters from the panel – just using the other side! Most of the accents strips are made from the front side. The bows, bells, stripes, plaid, and Christmas words make this an exciting background for the Holly wreath. One of the fat-quarters had two stockings printed on it. I used the one on the wreath and I embroidered the second stocking for the quilt label.

Image of Quilt Close Up
See the candy canes made from the reverse stripe?
Image of Back of Quilt
You can see the quilting, the extra stocking as a label, and the prairie point hanging method here.

The wreath is made using fused holly leaf shapes from the Christmas tree panel. Being a digital print, the fabric has a sparkle of light to it, making the wreath sparkle as well.

You might notice I didn’t have time to take great pictures – and apparently I borrowed my husband’s house shoes that day!

Even the pieced binding is made from the fat-quarter panel!

This is a fun quilt to make and so easy to shop for if you use the two panels! While I have no official timeline, my guess is that these fabrics will be in shops by summer!

If you have Christmas yardage in your stash – you can use it! I wrote this pattern to work with the panels as shown OR using your own choices of fabrics. The same method applies to both – it’s all about the value!

Here’s how Holly look inside the catalog!

I designed Phoebee 2.0 using BOTH sides of Hoffman California Fabrics “Electric Garden” as the focus fabric -it’s available in shops now!

Image of Electric Garden

Shop all my patterns at my Etsy Shop: Creative Bee Studios (Click HERE)

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Jacq O’Lantern Quilt Makes a Happy Boo!

Jacq O’Lantern has a happy little ghoul popping right out her top like a jack-in-the-box! The first mini #usebothsides quilt pattern, Jacq O’Lantern is too much fun to make!

She’s a pint-size lesson about value but when you make her, you’ve learned the easy tricks for using value to make any of the patterns using both sides of one focus fabric! Image of Quilt on Hanger

I was never real big on halloween decorations. I preferred to use that money to buy more Christmas lights and decorations. We didn’t avoid Halloween with our kids, but we also didn’t make a big fuss about it. So…why is it I LOVE Halloween fabric so much?

As a kid I only had a couple of drawings I liked to do – over and over. One was a beach scene with a palm tree (are you surprised?). The other was a witch on a broomstick.–she always had a long chin that jutted out and a big ole wart on her nose. Maybe these Halloween fabrics take me back to my childhood or something. Several of my favorite quilts and projects are Halloween themed. I’m sure you seen them before but, well, ’tis the season!

Image of Punch Needle

Black Kitty Punch Needle

Image of Instant Bargello Quilt

Instant Bargello Quilt

Image of Halloween Quilt

If you like Halloween fabrics like I do, chances are you have everything you need in your stash to make this little gal. So grab your stash – and turn it over! #usebothsides

Our youngest daughter’s name is Jacquelyn. We’ve always had nicknames for her such as

Jacq

Jacq Jacq

Da Jacqinator  (at the age of two she could “destroy” a room in minutes)

Jacqqity Jacq (don’t talk back)

and, among others,

Jacq O’Lantern.

Jacq O’Lantern Quilt Pattern makes a mini (a mere 12″ square) to hang perfectly on wire hanger.

See Jacq O’Lantern and all her friends HERE in my Etsy shop, Creative Bee Studios! 

 

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You might not be a quilter if…

Buyer’s beware…Image of Harry Potter Quilts Not Blankets Meme

Recently I’ve had companies promoting to me on my Facebook feed. They show pictures of fabulously pieced and appliqued quilts for sale at AMAZING prices! These are intricate and well-done, obviously made by individuals–and not massed-produced, quilts. The problem is they are fake companies stealing real quilters’ pictures and using them to cheat other people.

What was my first clue?  THEY CALLED THEM BLANKETS!

It’s been a “thing” in my family for years that when one of them asks for me to pass them a blanket, I shout, “They’re quilts, not blankets! I am not a blanketer!” (Kinda like Harry Potter, only with a pretend wand.)

 

Second clue: $59

It’s amazing (and kinda sad) how many people respond excitedly to these posts by tagging their friends and loved ones  to, for example, buy the brilliant pieced, appliqued, and quilted musician-themed quilt of a cello for $59! (We all know that might cover the cost of the batting and backing.)

Third clue: TONS of different quilts.

It’s like they just keep snagging quilt pictures from Etsy,  Craftsy and Pinterest and slapping  prices on them to sell! I was going to share a pic of one company promoting a Star Wars quilt that appears to have been hanging in a quilt show. I don’t want to do more harm than good by posting the fake site , so I won’t.

I’ve recently joined a pattern-maker group and, sure enough, they are suggesting you search these sites to see if these companies have stolen your pictures. (I have no idea what you do if that happens.)

What to do about the sites? I try to report the company, when allowed by Facebook. I also comment on the post that the company is a fraud. The only other thing I know to do is to tell as many people as I know not to fall for something that looks too good to be true.

I hope these bad people get caught before they steal more people’s money and, who knows, identity!

No mercy in my house–’cause that’s what you get when you call a quilt a blanket!

Several followers have asked about out-of-stock patterns in my Etsy shop: They are restocked! I apologize that I was unable to respond to your notes – IT glitches, I guess!  Shop here:  www.etsy.com/shop/CreativeBeeStudios.com
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Wild West Quilts

Thinking caps, please…

South Dakota, wildlife everywhere, incredible terrain, bison strolling along the roadside, animal skulls…this isn’t some cutesy butterfly pattern I’m introducing…in fact, it took this Southeast Missouri girl some time to wrap her head around it…

…but with the right fabrics – WOW! I’m diggin’ this bison skull quilt pattern. I hope you are, too!Image of Bison Skull Quilt

As many of you know from “South Dakota Quilts & More” (click here), our recent trip to the Black Hills Playhouse in Custer State Park included some fun sights, statues, monuments and, of course, quilt shops.

Tanka is the first pattern in what I call my “Out West” series.

Tanka, in Lakota, means “big, great”.

I chose feathers on a light background for the focus fabric. The skull is made from the reverse side of it and the hanging feather decoration is cut from the front. The background fabrics for this quilt were really fun to play with! Don’t you just love that black and white fence row fabric at the bottom? I found it and “several” other fabulous fabrics at The Quilt Shop in Chamberlain, SD.Image of Bison Quilt Closeup

A fun element of making these quilts is mixing up the background fabrics. This one has batik, southwest, gold circles on gray (but reversed), grunge and a fur look to really give interest to the quilt.

It’s so much fun to #usebothsides of fabrics and it’s a great way to learn about the nuances of value. You won’t look at fabric the same way again! AND when you use both sides, you DOUBLE your stash! Give it a try!

If you like the wildlife theme, hang on! There’s some really fun ones in the thinker and on the design wall!

Shop HERE for #usebothsides patterns.

Don’t forget about Jack (buck), made with Mossy Oak camouflage fabric!

Choose the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt page for the latest block. Only one to go!

Can you guess what the next #usebothsides pattern will be?

 

Meet Jack-the Deer Quilt

It’s a boy! Jack is the first boy made with both sides of one focus fabric.

I used a Mossy Oak camouflage from my local quilt shop. There are LOTS of camouflage fabrics on the market you could use.

I thought this one a might stiff when I pulled it off the bolt but after a quick wash and dry, it was great to work with!

As I describe in all the #usebothsides patterns, you’ll want to see a good contrast in values (black and white pictures tell the truth) when you choose your focus fabric.

*Full-size paper template.

*Complete, detailed instructions.

*Fast and easy to make.

*Guide for auditioning and choosing your focus and background fabrics.

*Learn the nuances of value while you have fun auditioning both sides of fabric!

Shop Jack and all the #usebothsides patterns HERE!

With fall just around the corner, you might want to get your ghoul on with Something’s Brewing!

River Heritage – Eagle’s Nest

Get a bird’s-eye view from Inspiration Point and Month Seven in the River Heritage BOM mystery quilt block: Eagle’s Nest.Image of Month Seven Ad

This is one of my favorite blocks!  It has a few more pieces and variety than the last two month’s blocks. This block has a nine-patch in the center which is set on-point and is surrounded by flying geese sections. Like the “inspirational” pictures accompanying this post, this block will have a high perch in the River Heritage quilt setting.

Inspiration Point, in the rolling hills of the Shawnee National Forest, provides a breathtaking panoramic view of the Mississippi River valley. It is located about 30 miles from Cape Girardeau, MO, near Wolf Lake, Illinois.

Image of Rock Cliffs

Approaching Inspiration Point

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Love the reflection of the tree below.

The hike to the viewing rocks is short and pleasant from the upper lot. (The lower lot looks like a pretty tough climb.) If we hadn’t seen people on the rocks, I’m not sure we would have ventured out to them, but the path isn’t as treacherous as it looked from the trail. (I don’t advise taking little ones as there are no safety rails.)Image of Adjacent RocksImage of Rocks

Image of Matt and View

My darling hubby taking me on another adventure to get pictures for River Heritage.

Image of View from Inspiration Point

Somewhere in the distance, one of those glimmers of water is the mighty Mississippi River, I am SURE of it! Since we made the trip and the climb to get these pictures for Eagle’s Nest, despite a bit of fear on my part (snakes and heights), we are going to go with it!Image of Eagle's Nest Block

River Heritage

Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt

Month 7 Eagle’s Nest

Welcome to the seventh month in the River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt! Eagle’s Nest has lots of pieces, but they are not difficult to make. If you go one section at a time, you’ll master what might appear to be the most difficult block in the quilt, first time around! Follow the instructions for value (light, medium, and dark) and use your own color scheme to make your block. Remember to check your values by taking a black and white picture of your fabric choices.

Cutting Instructions:

For center nine-patch:                                              For cornerstones:                                         

Five dark 2 5/8” squares                                             Four light 2” squares

Four light 2 5/8” squares

 

For triangle points:                                                   For flying geese border:

Two medium 5 3/8” squares, cut diagonally              Twelve light 2 x 3 ½” bars

Sixteen dark 2” squares

RST = right sides together

Nine-patch: Lay out squares according to picture. Chain-piece column 2 on column 1, RST, pressing the top row to the right, middle row to the left, bottom row to the right. Repeat by adding column 3 to column 2, RST.  Turn top row down onto middle row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open. Repeat by turning assembly onto bottom row, nestle seams, pin, and stitch. Press open.

Add points: Fold each triangle in half and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the center. Likewise, fold each side of the nine-patch and press a center mark or use a pin to mark the centers. Match a triangle center with a nine-patch center, RST, pin, and stitch. Press towards the triangle. Repeat for other three sides. Trim and square to 9 ½ inches.

Outer Border: Draw a line from corner to corner on the wrong side of each 2-inch square. Make flying geese by laying the square on the right side of a 2 x 3 ½ inch bar, with the drawn line starting in the center of the bar and going downward to the right. Stitch on the line. Press. Open the layers and trim the center layer using scissors, leaving about a ¼-inch seam. (This leaves the original rectangle and the new triangle on top.) Repeat process for the left side of the bar. Trim/square if necessary to 2 x 3 ½ inches (same as the original bar size). Make eight.

Assemble block: Lay out flying geese, bars, and corner squares around the center block according to the picture. Stitch one flying geese on each side of one bar. Press to the bar. Make four sets. Now add corner squares, one on each end of two sets. Press to the squares.

Pin sets without squares to left and right sides of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open. Pin sets with corner squares to the top and bottom of center block, being careful to match seams. Stitch and press open.

Trim and square your block to 12 ½ inches.

River Heritage Month 7 Eagle’s Nest (printer-friendly version)

 

Share your block using #riverheritage on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Month Eight will be posted on August 13, 2018 at www.blog.creativebeestudios.com.

Subscribe below to catch all the buzz! Check out my Etsy Shop: CreativeBeeStudios (click here). Bubbles pattern is now available! #usebothsidesImage of Whale Quilt

 

 

 

Patriotic Decorating with Quilts

“Are you a quilter?” has no one said ever when they walked through my front door. I kinda, sorta display quilts all throughout my house. Only when I see my house through a none-quilter’s eyes do I realize the plethora of quilts on display!

Sometime’s there is the fleeting thought…do I have a problem?  Bloop, its gone! That is why I surround myself with fellow quilters–if I have a problem, they do, too!

Image of Patriotic Quilt and Crosses

Nancy’s quilt with the Wall of Crosses.

If you’ve been following my blog for a few months, you’ll know that I recently lost my dad, a World War II vet. I hosted the memorial open house in his honor and had the task of decorating. Patriotic decor was an easy choice. I asked my friend Nancy to bring her patriotic quilts and between the two of us, we decorated an entire fellowship Image of Flag Quilthall! Who knew we had that many quilts of one genre. Here are just a few pics:Image of Three Quilts on TablesImage of Quilt and Lantern

Image of Quilt of Valor

Dad’s Quilt of Valor on display.

And here is Liberty, a #usebothsides quilt decorating my house.Image of Lighthouse Quilt  Click HERE for the pattern and focus fabric kit.

I had a friend ask me once where I will hang all of my #usebothsides quilts in my house?  I’d need another HOUSE! (There are sixteen patterns now and two more on the way coming soon!)

How do you decorate with quilts? Leave a comment below.

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Looking for the River Heritage Mystery Quilt blocks? Click on the tab at the top of my blog!

Quilting with Etsy

If you are like me, sometimes you’d like to wear a button: “I’d rather be quilting”.

Let’s face it, quilting is time consuming. When I’m doing something else, like laundry, housework, or computer-work, it doesn’t really count in my mind as being productive. Those are just things I have to do…like buying tires.

So, I get it when some quilters aren’t familiar or comfortable with on-line shopping sites — because each one takes time to learn and can keep us from essential stitching time.

Maybe this little five-point guide to Etsy can save a quilter some time while introducing some fun quilting options. I’ll use my own shop for the examples.

Five things to know about Etsy:

*Etsy is an online global marketplace for all kinds of unique goods. It features handmade items, supplies,  or vintage goods from little shops from all around the world.

Image of Etsy Shop

Search for Creative Bee Studios

*Etsy is easy to use. Simply type the name of the shop you are looking for in the search bar, like this   “Creative Bee Studios”

 

or use key words to describe an item you are looking for, i.e  “Seahorse Quilt Pattern”.

Image of Etsy Search Results

Search for Seahorse Quilt Pattern

 

 

*When you find something you like, click on the heart and it becomes a favorite of yours. All of your favorite items and shops are accessible through the simple “Favorites” button. You can to browse a feed that Etsy provides based on your searches and your favorites.

 

*Purchasing on Etsy is easy and safe. The Etsy company handles the monetary transaction completely, so the shopowner never gets your payment information. For example, when someone places an order in my shop, I only get that person’s name and shipping address so that I can fill their order. That makes Etsy a place where you can shop online at many different boutiques while only providing your payment information to one company.

 

You can also easily read reviews to see how other customers like a shop and the goods they’ve received. This is highly motivating for shop owners since they only want top ratings and reviews. You are sure to get good service!Image of Shop Reviews

*Quilters can shop for all things quilty–kits, patterns, fabric, notions, fusibles–all kinds of goodies,  from Wonder Clips to Featherweights, even quilting themed clothing to quilt in!

Click right HERE to give Etsy a try!
You can go to my Etsy shop by clicking HERE.

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Join the FREE River Heritage Block-of-the-Month Mystery Quilt — See all the posts by clicking here.

 

 

OKLAHOMA! Backroads in South Dakota

In 2014, I made this Bonnie Hunter quilt called “Oklahoma Backroads” (click here for pattern link) for my daughter’s graduation from high school and to commemorate her role as Laurey Williams in OKLAHOMA!. Image of Quilt

Image of Quilt Label

Notice I named Jacq’s quilt using all caps with an exclamation point – as the musical is named –OKLAHOMA!.

I used lots of scraps (as you do in a Bonnie Hunter quilt – which I LOVE)! Some of them included fabrics from  my mother-in-law’s stash. One of those fabrics was from matching colonial dresses she made for Jacquelyn and her American Girl doll, Kirsten, for a trip to Colonial Williamsburg.  Also, i used fabric and lace on the borders which were used on Jacquelyn’s costume for the role of Laurey. Image of OK! PosterImage of Dancer SpinningImage of Quilt by PoolImage of Scene from OKLAHOMA!

As a graduate with a major in musical theatre, Jacquelyn heads out tomorrow to work three months in South Dakota and she’s taking “OKLAHOMA! Backroads” quilt with her as she’s once again playing the role of Laurey Williams for Black Hills Playhouse. As you might guess, our vacation this year will be to South Dakota for opening night!

I love that there are meaningful fabrics in the quilt she’s packing.Image of TheatreImage of Theatre Inside

We’ve never been to this area of the country, so I’m looking forward to seeing all the sights AND quilt shops (recommendations please)!

When I made this quilt, I separated my scraps into lights, mediums, and darks. However, I really hadn’t discovered that the values change, depending upon what values surround them. I would have achieved a more defined pattern and secondary pattern had I paid attention to that AND had I used my camera’s black and white function to check the values. I’ve learned a lot with #usebothsides quilts when it comes to VALUE! (Click here for a post about value.)

Be sure to check out the newest pattern, AngelinaImage of Pointe Shoe Quilt and all the #usebothsides patterns (click here) in my Etsy shop!

 

 

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